Home From the Wires Preserved 1.8M-year-old skull could re-write human evolution

Preserved 1.8M-year-old skull could re-write human evolution

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Friday, October 18, 2013

Independent: A perfectly preserved 1.8 million-year-old skull of an ape-like man was discovered, which could re-write the early history of human evolution.

The skull and its lower jawbone were found at a palaeontology site near the medieval town of Dmansi in the foothills of the Caucuses in Georgia, which has become one of the most important centres for understanding human origins outside Africa.

The scientists suggest that the Dmanisi individuals probably belonged to Homo erectus, the first human species to emerge from Africa, and that certain African species such as Homo habilis, which had lived earlier than H. erectus, may actually be the same species as Dmanisi man.

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