Home From the Wires Half of public school kids are poor

Half of public school kids are poor

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Friday, October 18, 2013

The Atlantic: A new study reminds us that poverty is the giant backpack dragging down American students.

In America, what you earn depends largely on your success in school. Unfortunately, your success in school depends largely on what your parents earn. It's an intergenerational Catch 22 that's at the heart of modern poverty.

 

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