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U.S. moose die-off remains unsolved

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Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Christian Science Monitor: Scientists are baffled by the death of a large numbers of moose across the U.S.

Moose populations across swaths of the US – from the West Coast to the East Coast, from the Rocky Mountains to the Mississippi River – are declining at an unprecedented rate, imperiling fragile ecosystems and putting the moose tourism industry on edge, the New York Times reported. But though scientists have a long list of culprits – disease; climate change; over-hunting – it’s not clear just what is causing moose to die in droves. And that means that scientists are at the moment unsure how to save America's moose.

Once, moose made headlines for doing a bit too well in the US. As the largest members of the deer family, Cervidae, blooming moose populations meant more accidents on rural, mountain roads, and more reports of moose attacks against humans.

Read more.



+1 #1 RE: U.S. moose die-off remains unsolvedGuest 2013-10-15 17:47:00
Extremely suspicious that this issue of moose dying-off comes up soon after the White Moose was killed a little bit ago..
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