Home From the Wires Diamonds stud atmosphere of Saturn and Jupiter

Diamonds stud atmosphere of Saturn and Jupiter

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Thursday, October 10, 2013

NationalGeographic: It sounds like science fiction, but as much as 10 million tons of diamonds may be stored in Saturn and Jupiter, researchers announced this week.

Observational evidence of storms on Saturn that actively generate carbon particles, combined with new laboratory experiments and models that show how carbon behaves under extreme conditions, have led a pair of scientists to posit that both planets may offer stable environments for the formation of diamonds.

 

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