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Online journals publishing fake science

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Friday, October 04, 2013

NPR: Many online journals will publish bad research for a fee, a sting by Science discovered.

To find out just how common predatory publishing is, Science contributor John Bohannon sent a deliberately faked research article 305 times to online journals. More than half the journals that supposedly reviewed the fake paper accepted it.

"This sting operation," Bohannan writes, reveals "the contours of an emerging Wild West in academic publishing."

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