Mars' soil traps surprising amount of water

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Friday, September 27, 2013

BBC: Analysis by Nasa's Curiosity rover on Mars has found more water than expected saturating Martian soil.

When it heated a small pinch of dirt scooped up from the ground, the most abundant vapour detected was H2O.

Curiosity researcher Laurie Leshin and colleagues tell Science Magazine that Mars' dusty red covering holds about 2% by weight of water.

This could be a useful resource for future astronauts, they say.

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