Home From the Wires Pinterest expands media content

Pinterest expands media content

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Tuesday, September 24, 2013

CNET: On the heels of announcing its first ad initiative, the social network is revamping its offerings for media shared on the site.

When a user posts an article, it will now include more information, such as the story's headline, author, description, and a link back to the original post. Users also can save a story to read later, create different boards to categorize stories by topic, and follow specific writers -- like the Washington Post's Tim Devaney -- to see more of that author's work in their Pinterest feeds.

 

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