Scientists tell Texas schools not to use books questioning evolution

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Thursday, September 19, 2013

UPI: Scientists reviewed biology textbooks and urged Texas education officials not to use books that question evolution or the state could become a "national embarrassment."

Religious conservatives have pressed the state to approve texts that water down evolutionary science and include references to creationism.

Texas, the nation's single largest textbook purchaser, has significant influence over the content textbook publishers use across the country. The debate over whether to include references to creationism as a scientific -- rather than religious -- alternative in explaining how humans came into being drew sharp rebukes from a panel of experts board members tapped to review the 14 potential biology books the state could approve, the Dallas Morning News said Tuesday.

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+1 #1 Intellectual repression at workGuest 2013-09-20 00:34:47
It is funny that those who espouse intellectual freedom are so often the first to shut down discussion and the free exchange of ideas. If Evolution were more than a theory we wouldn't be talking about this, but those scientists banding together to pressure textbook publishers are really operating from their own religious/world view bias that leaves God or a Designer out of the discussion. Let's call it what it is.
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