Ohio governor wants adults to work for food stamps

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Monday, September 09, 2013

The Columbus Dispatch: Ohio's Gov. John Kasich will limit food stamps for 130,000 adults starting Jan. 1.

To qualify for benefits, able-bodied adults without children will be required to spend at least 20 hours a week working, training for a job, volunteering or performing a similar type of activity unless they live in one of 16 counties exempt because of high unemployment. The requirements begin next month; however, those failing to meet them would not lose benefits until Jan. 1.

“It’s important that we provide more than just a monetary benefit, that we provide job training, an additional level of support that helps put (food-stamp recipients) on a path toward a career and out of poverty,” said Ben Johnson, spokesman for the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services.

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Guest
+2 #1 Duh???Guest 2013-09-09 21:15:12
Really? Make the people on the public dole do something to improve their self-image? Actually make them work? What about drug testing the others? Most of us that are employed and providing the funds for the unemployed, have to show up, every day, and on time, and are subject to random drug tests. That's how it works. The biggest benefit will be for the individualswho have been out of work so long they are beginning to feel useless. I know, because I've been there. I ended up cleaning a medical clinic at night for a few bucks an hour. It was amazing how the sense of accomplishment improved my attitude. Too bad our governor would rather tax the workers more so they can continue to dole out the dollars. Way to go Gov Kasich!
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