Looters burn mummies in Egyptian museum

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Tuesday, August 20, 2013

MSN: Looters store a 3,500-year-old statue and more than 1,000 other artifacts from the Malawi Museum.

For days after vandals ransacked the building Wednesday, there were no police or soldiers in sight as groups of teenage boys burned mummies and broke limestone sculptures too heavy for the thieves to carry away. The security situation remained precarious Monday as gunmen atop nearby buildings fired on a police station near the museum.

The museum's ticket agent was killed during the storming of the building, according to the Antiquities Ministry.

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