South Dakota tribe ends prohibition

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Thursday, August 15, 2013

BBC: A South Dakota Native American tribe ravaged by alcohol abuse has voted to end prohibition, which critics say will only worsen the reservation's problems.

The Oglala Sioux Tribe must now apply to the county and state for a permit.

Under the law, the tribe will own and operate stores on the reservation, and profits will be used for education and detoxification and treatment centres.

 

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