Amazon launches site for purchase of fine art

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Wednesday, August 07, 2013

 

Reuters: Customers can buy original and limited edition works of art from more than 150 prominent galleries and dealers via Amazon Art.

The announcement came Tuesday, a day after Seattle-based Amazon.com Inc. announced that its CEO, Jeff Bezos, had purchased The Washington Post.

Amazon Art features 40,000 works from more than 4,500 artists. The wide range of works includes folk art, impressionism and modern art.

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