The death of the salesman

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Monday, July 29, 2013

TheAtlantic: Technology threatens retail sector jobs.

Circuit City is dead; Best Buy is dying. Borders is gone; Barnes & Noble is shuttering storefronts. Kmart has closed 40 percent of its stores in the past decade. As recently as 1998, Sears was in the Dow 30. Today, Sears Holding isn’t even in the S&P 500.

Companies come and go, you might say, and American families have more-serious things to worry about than the fate of Sears’s shareholders. But the decline of big-box retail and department stores could also mark the fall of retail as a job engine.

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