Device turns any bike into electric one

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Friday, July 19, 2013

CNET: The Rubbee on Kickstarter is a clever take on the concept of electric bike conversion kits.

A friction wheel sits on the back tire while a built-in electric motor turns it, giving you up to a 15-mile range. The device weighs 14 pounds and can be attached and removed quickly. A handle lets you carry it around and stash it inside, out of sight.

 

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