McDonald's under fire for assuming workers have two jobs

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Thursday, July 18, 2013

Salon.com: McDonalds got heat for telling its staff to have two jobs. But its financial planning advice is even more offensive.

Over the past few days, McDonald’s has gotten itself quite a bit of bad publicity, after it teamed with VISA to create a proposed sample budget for the enormously profitable fast food corporation’s hundreds of thousands of low-paid workers.

 

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