Home From the Wires The economic cost of hangovers

The economic cost of hangovers

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Tuesday, July 09, 2013

The Atlantic: Excessive boozing costs the economy about $1.37 in lost productivity for each drink consumed.

The Fourth of July is beer's annual breakout party, with weekly sales often surpassing $1 billion around Independence Day. So when the Fifth of July falls on a weekday like this year, employers are advised to, well, manage their expectations.

 

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