Home From the Wires Processed foods looking more natural

Processed foods looking more natural

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Monday, June 17, 2013

AP: Food companies are responding to increasing disdain at overly-processed looking foods by making food look more imperfect.

The result is that companies are tossing out the identical shapes and drab colors that scream of factory conveyor belts. There's no way to measure exactly how much food makers are investing to make their products look more natural or fresh. But adaption is seen as necessary for fueling steady growth.

Appearances have always been a part of food production. But some experts say the visual cues food makers are using to suggest their products are wholesome fuel confusion about what's natural and what isn't.

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