Eating bugs could help feed the world

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Monday, May 13, 2013

Cbsnews.com: The United Nations says eating insects may combat global hunger and boost health worldwide by reducing malnutrition and even air pollution.

The U.N.'s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) said on Monday that grasshoppers, ants and other members of the insect world are an underutilized food for people, livestock and pets.

 

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