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Tiger moms turning kids into robots

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Friday, May 10, 2013

CNN.com: Author of "Tiger Babies Strike Back"  argues against parents who demand perfection in school and extracurricular activities from their kids.

When I was a kid, I was obedient and quiet. I automatically knew that talking too loud, making a fuss or being assertive would never fly. I did what I was told.
I was a Chinese girl.

 

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