Good season despite climate change worries | Print |  Email
The Latest
Thursday, December 13, 2012

12.13.12 Thumbnail SkiOregon prides itself on having the longest ski season in the U.S., with November-May openings. But a new report projects climate change will warm winter temperatures 4-10 degrees by the end of the century, threatening the long snow season that allows Oregon's winter sports industry to thrive.

 
It's time to take stock as the year ends | Print |  Email
Contributed Blogs
Wednesday, December 12, 2012

12.12.12 Thumbnail TomCoxPart of your end-of-year routine should be to take stock. What did you learn in 2012? How will you make 2013 better? This is a form of benchmarking. Comparing yourself to yourself, and to others, and looking for ways to do better. Leadership expert Tom Cox tells you how to do it.

 
Unique downtown La Grande project | Print |  Email
Robin Doussard
Tuesday, December 11, 2012

12.11.12 Thumbnail LagrandeA new 19,000-square-foot indoor development is being built in downtown La Grande that mixes retail, education space and a business incubator all in one venue.

 
The importance of performance evals | Print |  Email
Contributed Blogs
Friday, December 07, 2012

12.07.12 Thumbnail EvaluationHumans are highly impacted by having even their small successes noticed. You don’t need to give awards or assemble the team for a public presentation. Just notice and acknowledge. You don’t have to say “good job” — just acknowledgement by a person in a position of authority is pleasant. And being ignored is unpleasant.

 
Sustainable businesses honored at NWEC conference | Print |  Email
On the Scene
Wednesday, December 05, 2012

12.05.12 Thumbnail SustainableFive Oregon companies were honored by the Oregon Governor's office as leaders in the sustainability field at the NWEC conference. 

 
Business leaders display united front | Print |  Email
Linda Baker
Tuesday, December 04, 2012

12.04.12 Thumbnail SummitAt the Oregon Leadership Summit, business and government leaders unite in calling for PERS reform, education investment and a decision on the Columbia River Crossing.

 
5 great books on leadership | Print |  Email
Contributed Blogs
Friday, November 30, 2012

11.30.12 Thumbnail BooksEffective leaders are constantly learning. To help you keep learning, here are five of leadership expert Tom Cox's favorite books, old and new, for growing a CEO’s or a manager’s capabilities. 

 
Astoria's evolving downtown | Print |  Email
Robin Doussard
Tuesday, November 20, 2012

11.20.12 Thumbnail AstoriaDowntown Astoria has many assets. It has myriad intact historic buildings from the 1920s, including the lovely renovated Liberty Theater and the Hotel Elliott. There is a great little mix of independent retail shops like Vintage Hardware and Foxgloves. It is a downtown that is real, where you can still shop at J.C. Penney, buy garden supplies and get your shoes repaired. For all those assets, there are challenges, of course.

 
Science, technology as economic drivers | Print |  Email
Linda Baker
Thursday, November 15, 2012

11.15.12 Thumbnail ScienceThe national Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer conference held this week in Portland underscores the role of science and technology innovation as a national economic development strategy.

 
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Corner Office: Sheree Arntson

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

Checking in with the managing director of Arnerich Massena.


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Healthcare Perspective

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY KIM MOORE

A conversation with Majd El-Azma, president and CEO of LifeWise Health Plan of Oregon, followed by the Healthcare Powerlist.


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Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


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A Complex Portrait: Immigration, Jobs and the Economy

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY JOE ROJAS-BURKE & KIM MOORE

Oregon Business reports on the visa squeeze, the skills gap and foreign-born residents who are revitalizing rural Oregon.


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Powerbook Perspective

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Friday, December 12, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

A conversation with Oregon state economist Josh Lehner.


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Healthcare pullback

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Thursday, November 20, 2014
112014-boehnercare-thumbBY JASON NORRIS | OB CONTRIBUTOR

Each month for Oregon Business, we assess factors that are shaping current capital market activity—and what they mean to investors. Here we take a look at two major developments regarding possible rollbacks of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).


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Corner Office: Marv LaPorte

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

The president of LaPorte & Associates lets us in on his day-to-day life.


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