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Oregon lawmakers moonlight as amateur scientists | Print |  Email
Opinion
Wednesday, April 24, 2013
BY SEN. ALAN OLSEN | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

04.24.13 Thumbnail DredgeMining2 Last week the Senate Committee on Environment and Natural Resources voted on two bills to ban legally permitted small-scale mining operations on Oregon's waterways. I voted against both bills for one simple reason: not once was the committee presented with scientific evidence that the practice of small-scale suction dredge mining is damaging to the environment.

 
Things fall apart | Print |  Email
The Latest
Tuesday, April 23, 2013
BY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

Thumbnail Update

SoloPower's closure caps a gloomy 10 days for Oregon business leaders.

 

 

 

 
Public safety reform offers better return on investment | Print |  Email
Opinion
Tuesday, April 23, 2013
BY RYAN DECKERT, NIK BLOSSER AND J. DAVID ZEHNTBAUER | OP-ED CONTRIBUTORS

04.23.13 Thumbnail PrisonIf what we strive for as a state is education over incarceration, now is the time for business leaders and elected officials to face Oregon’s expensive public safety system with the same courage and forward-thinking that has made Oregon famous in the health care reform arena.

 
More than $9B invested in Oregon renewable resources | Print |  Email
The Latest
Monday, April 22, 2013
BY EMMA HALL | OB WEB EDITOR

04.26.12 SolarPanelThumbnailInvestment in renewable energy manufacturing and projects in Oregon totals over $9 billion, according to a new report by the Renewable Northwest Project released for Earth Day.

 

 
Rough & Ready closes; Nike disses South Waterfront | Print |  Email
The Latest
Friday, April 19, 2013
BY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

Thumbnail UpdateRough & Ready, the 90-year old mill featured in our current issue, shut down yesterday.

 

 

 

 
Portland's jobs flee the urban core | Print |  Email
The Latest
Thursday, April 18, 2013
BY BRANDON SAWYER | OB RESEARCH EDITOR

04.18.13 Thumbnail CommuteWhile residential flight to the suburbs ebbed in the last decade or two amid urban gentrification, most jobs are still migrating outward according to a new Brookings report.

 

 

 
Converting carbon credits to health care | Print |  Email
Linda Baker
Wednesday, April 17, 2013
BY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

04.17.13 Thumbnail ForestThe Pinchot Institute for Conservation and PacificSource Health Plans have partnered to provide a first of its kind ATreeM card that uses proceeds from American Carbon Registry-certified carbon credits to provide health care funds to family forest owners.

 
Supporting working parents is good for business | Print |  Email
Opinion
Wednesday, April 17, 2013
BY DEBBIE KITCHIN | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

04.17.13 Thumbnail PreschoolOregon is one of the least affordable states in the country for child care. The average cost of enrolling a toddler at an Oregon day care center now exceeds the cost of college tuition at our public colleges and universities.

 

 
Real estate market adapts to rapidly changing economy | Print |  Email
On the Scene
Thursday, April 11, 2013
BY EMMA HALL | OB WEB EDITOR

04.11.13 Thumbnail CityPlanning“This will be the decade in which we find out who wants to live above a Walmart,” Uwe Brandes says. Environmental, financial and demographic trends have created a new economy that will radically change urban planning and development patterns through 2020.

 
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Legislative Preview: A Shifting Balance

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014
BY APRIL STREETER

Democratic gains pave the way for a revival of environment and labor bills as revenue reform languishes.


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Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


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The clean fuels opportunity

News
Monday, November 10, 2014
111014-dirtyfuel-thumbBY KIM MOORE | OB RESEARCH EDITOR

A market for low-carbon transportation fuels has a chance to flourish in Oregon if regulators adopt the second phase of the state’s Clean Fuels Program.


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Kill the Meeting

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY AMY MILSHTEIN

Meetings get a bad rap. A few local companies make them count.


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Reimagining education to solve Oregon's student debt and underemployment problems

News
Thursday, November 13, 2014
carsonstudentdept-thumbBY RYAN CARSON | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

How do we skill up our future technology workforce in a smart way to take advantage of these high-paying jobs? The answer shouldn’t focus only on helping people get a bachelor’s degree.


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Downtime

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY JESSICA RIDGWAY

Bob Dethlefs, CEO of Evanta, balances work and play.


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The short list: Holiday habits of six Oregon CEOs

The Latest
Thursday, December 11, 2014
121214-xmaslist1BY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

We ask business and nonprofit leaders how they survive the season.


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