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Annex West Hayden Island

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Opinion
Tuesday, June 04, 2013
BY  JIM CARTER | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

06.04.13 Thumbnail WestHaydenIslandOver the years, smart investments made in regional infrastructure — rivers, rails, runways and roads — have provided Oregon businesses with efficient and cost effective access to foreign markets. This fall the Portland City Council will make a decision that has statewide, if not national, implications for Oregon’s continued trade strength — the annexation of West Hayden Island.

 

Building community for minority professionals

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Opinion
Tuesday, May 21, 2013
BY MARI WATANABE | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

05.21.13 Thumbnail MinorityImagine being a person of color, raised in a diverse community and then moving to the Portland region only to find out that it is the whitest major city in the country, according to the U.S Census. Then imagine being the employer who recruits me, but then I leave because I cannot find my ethnic community.

 

Protecting our rivers

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Opinion
Tuesday, May 14, 2013
04.24.13 Thumbnail DredgeMining2BY SEN. ALAN BATES | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

The practice of suction dredge mining has been limited or stopped in Washington, California, Idaho and all federal lands. Yet, suction dredge mining is one of two placer gold mining activities still commonly found in Oregon, often in our state’s most remote and beautiful rivers, and the same watersheds that have historically supported strong salmon and trout fisheries.

 

Time to move forward on Klamath Settlement

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Opinion
Tuesday, May 07, 2013
BY GREG ADDINGTON | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

05.07.13 Thumbnail KlamathIt is time for the people of Oregon to be heard on the Klamath Settlement and it is time for real leaders in Washington to step up, confront the hard questions, and take up the  Settlement in a meaningful way.

 

 

State should invest more in higher education

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Opinion
Thursday, May 02, 2013
BY MARGARET KIRKPATRICK, BILL THORNDIKE | OP-ED CONTRIBUTORS
Oregon higher education op-ed

Education reforms are important, but they shouldn’t distract us from boosting our state’s commitment to post-secondary education as the pathway to opportunity for our people and prosperity for our state. That commitment will require not only reform but investment.

 

Oregon lawmakers moonlight as amateur scientists

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Opinion
Wednesday, April 24, 2013
BY SEN. ALAN OLSEN | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

04.24.13 Thumbnail DredgeMining2 Last week the Senate Committee on Environment and Natural Resources voted on two bills to ban legally permitted small-scale mining operations on Oregon's waterways. I voted against both bills for one simple reason: not once was the committee presented with scientific evidence that the practice of small-scale suction dredge mining is damaging to the environment.

 

Public safety reform offers better return on investment

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Opinion
Tuesday, April 23, 2013
BY RYAN DECKERT, NIK BLOSSER AND J. DAVID ZEHNTBAUER | OP-ED CONTRIBUTORS

04.23.13 Thumbnail PrisonIf what we strive for as a state is education over incarceration, now is the time for business leaders and elected officials to face Oregon’s expensive public safety system with the same courage and forward-thinking that has made Oregon famous in the health care reform arena.

 

Supporting working parents is good for business

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Opinion
Wednesday, April 17, 2013
BY DEBBIE KITCHIN | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

04.17.13 Thumbnail PreschoolOregon is one of the least affordable states in the country for child care. The average cost of enrolling a toddler at an Oregon day care center now exceeds the cost of college tuition at our public colleges and universities.

 

 

Opposition to genetically engineered foods misguided

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Opinion
Tuesday, April 09, 2013
BY SCOTT DAHLMAN | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

04.09.13 Thumbnail CornIt’s hard to believe there’s anything more about GE foods to debate. But once again, activists are trying to raise public fears about genetically engineered foods.

 

 

 
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Editor's Letter: Power Play

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Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


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Reimagining education to solve Oregon's student debt and underemployment problems

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How do we skill up our future technology workforce in a smart way to take advantage of these high-paying jobs? The answer shouldn’t focus only on helping people get a bachelor’s degree.


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Tackling the CEO-worker pay gap

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An SEC rule targets the disparity between executive and employee compensation, reigniting a long-standing debate about corporate social responsibility.


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