Crimson Trace's laser focus

| Print |  Email
Articles - May 2011
Wednesday, April 20, 2011

The company maintains its hold on the market through its military connections and research and development of new technologies. Crimson Trace hired ex-U.S. Special Forces agents Dale Suzuki and Jeff Hoblitt in 2009 to draw upon their military connections to land government contracts. Last August, the company announced a contract to supply the U.S. Navy Seals with invisible laser sights used in conjunction with specialized goggles.

0511_CrimsonTrace_02

The company specializes in laser sights that are integrated into gun grips

Though its military contracts only account for roughly 5% of  revenue (most of the business is with commercial clients such as law enforcement agencies), Crimson Trace spokesman Iain Harrison says he is confident that future contracts with the military will push the company forward. “The military is one of the most conservative institutions out there; it’s a big ship that is slow to turn,” he says. “But once they see it out in the field, they get on board.” Last year, the company had three engineering staffers designing new products. They now have 10.

Crimson Trace plans to capitalize on its partnership with Pennsylvania-based precision part maker CNC manufacturing to produce laser grips that can be custom-fitted for a customer using a variety of materials such as resin-reinforced wood.
Ever-changing products aside, a lot of it comes down to that bullet point about top-notch customer service.

“Americans are satisfied with poor service,” says Danielson. “We want raving fans."

Peter Beland



 

Comments   

 
Guest
0 #1 RE: Crimson Trace's laser focusGuest 2013-05-20 11:56:45
I have a glock G20, with a laser formed in the trigger gard, and a red button on the back of grip. I was told it was crimson trace. I need to find what battery it takes, and possibly the laser model.
respectfully: TOM
Quote | Report to administrator
 

More Articles

5 ways successful people kickstart the day

The Latest
Thursday, April 02, 2015
coffeethumbBY JACOB PALMER | DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Are mornings the most productive part of the day?  We ask five successful executives how they get off to a good start.


Read more...

Fighting Fire With Fire

May 2015
Friday, April 24, 2015
BY BEN DEJARNETTE | INVESTIGATEWEST

Timber companies and environmental groups take a stab at collaboration to boost logging and restoration in Oregon fires.


Read more...

Beyond Bodegas

April 2015
Friday, March 27, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Five years in the making, the Portland Mercado — the city’s first Latino public market — will celebrate its grand opening April 11. A $3.5 million public-private partnership spearheaded by Hacienda CDC, the market will house 15 to 20 businesses in the food, retail and service sectors. It has some big-name funders, including the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation and JPMorgan Chase. The project goals are equally ambitious: to improve cross-cultural understanding, alleviate poverty and spur community economic development. 


Read more...

Can small be large?

Linda Baker
Wednesday, April 01, 2015
040115-lindablogthumbBY LINDA BAKER

Leaders in Oregon's ag sector gathered this morning in Portland’s Coopers Hall winery/taproom to discuss the role of the region as an export gateway, impediments to exporting products and solutions to containerized shipping challenges.


Read more...

Knight Cancer Challenge No Biotech Dream

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY JOE CORTRIGHT

The Knight challenge is an important instance of philanthropy. But we should not assume it will magically transform OHSU into a business- and job-spinning engine for the local economy.


Read more...

Emperor of the Sea

April 2015
Friday, March 27, 2015
BY COURTNEY SHERWOOD | Photos by Jason E. Kaplan

Pacific Seafood, one of the world’s largest processors, is rebranding as a more transparent and consumer-friendly operation. A controversial CEO and monopoly accusations from coastal fishermen complicate the tale.


Read more...

On the Road

April 2015
Friday, March 27, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER

My daughter turned 18 last week, and for her birthday I got her a Car2Go membership. Not to label myself a disruptor or anything, but it felt like a groundbreaking moment. The two of us, mother and child, were participating in a new teen rite of passage: Instead of handing over the car keys, I handed over a car-sharing card — with the caveat that she not use the gift as her own personal car service.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS