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Crimson Trace's laser focus

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Articles - May 2011
Wednesday, April 20, 2011

The company maintains its hold on the market through its military connections and research and development of new technologies. Crimson Trace hired ex-U.S. Special Forces agents Dale Suzuki and Jeff Hoblitt in 2009 to draw upon their military connections to land government contracts. Last August, the company announced a contract to supply the U.S. Navy Seals with invisible laser sights used in conjunction with specialized goggles.


The company specializes in laser sights that are integrated into gun grips

Though its military contracts only account for roughly 5% of  revenue (most of the business is with commercial clients such as law enforcement agencies), Crimson Trace spokesman Iain Harrison says he is confident that future contracts with the military will push the company forward. “The military is one of the most conservative institutions out there; it’s a big ship that is slow to turn,” he says. “But once they see it out in the field, they get on board.” Last year, the company had three engineering staffers designing new products. They now have 10.

Crimson Trace plans to capitalize on its partnership with Pennsylvania-based precision part maker CNC manufacturing to produce laser grips that can be custom-fitted for a customer using a variety of materials such as resin-reinforced wood.
Ever-changing products aside, a lot of it comes down to that bullet point about top-notch customer service.

“Americans are satisfied with poor service,” says Danielson. “We want raving fans."

Peter Beland



0 #1 RE: Crimson Trace's laser focusGuest 2013-05-20 11:56:45
I have a glock G20, with a laser formed in the trigger gard, and a red button on the back of grip. I was told it was crimson trace. I need to find what battery it takes, and possibly the laser model.
respectfully: TOM
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