Sponsored by Oregon Business

Mysterious wheat crop loss puzzles researchers

| Print |  Email
Articles - April 2011
Wednesday, March 23, 2011
Oregon Wheat commissioner Tom McCoy said he heard talk that the pressure to plant in light of the unusual rain put pressure on the herbicide applicators to spray in conditions in which they would normally not spray. “It’s not anybody’s fault,” says Thun, referring to the unusual weather’s effect on the herbicide distribution. The ODA is investigating whether any of the 51 commercial pesticide applicators who sprayed did so in dangerous conditions, but like with the final ruling on what caused the yellowing in the wheat, was not ready in mid-March to release its findings. “If there was a misapplication, we would proceed with enforcement action,” says ODA spokesperson Bruce Pokarney.

Under fire by environmentalists because of fears that it will spur herbicide-resistant weeds, the broad-spectrum herbicide glyphosate has been used in the region for decades. Instead of tilling a fallow field for weeds with a tractor before planting, potentially losing topsoil that is precious in dry-land areas, a grower can apply the herbicide instead. In the past four to five years, versions of this no-till system have been used more and more in light of glyphosate’s dropping price, along with rising fuel costs.

But with its increased use comes the increased likelihood that it could cause unforeseen problems like in Umatilla County. “Chemical companies are really defensive about this,” says Maley. The situation was made worse because it was coupled with cold, wet conditions and a ready supply of rooted dead weeds that triggered widespread fungus growth. “It’s really difficult to place cause and effect,” says Mundt, referring to whether the herbicide weakened the plants and made them susceptible to fungus damage, or the other way around.

In Morrow County, about one in 10 plants were affected on over 30,000 acres of wheat, roughly worth $14 million. Morrow County extension agent Larry Lutcher sent a sample of the yellowed wheat to agriculture labs at Purdue University. They came back positive for three types of serial yellow dwarf virus, a pathogen carried by aphids that can cause widespread damage depending on the amount of aphids carrying it. When Morrow County’s corn farmers harvested, it unleashed swarms of aphids that bred on the wet corn leaves.

In Gilliam County, swarms were so thick in early September that Maley had to wear a facemask when he went for his daily runs. Growers in the Midwest see this a lot more than growers here, says Lutcher. “The symptomology is leaning to aphids,” he says. “But we’re going to have to wait and see.” According to Mundt, farmers will know the severity of the serial yellow dwarf virus this month and later in the season as the virus matures, discoloring and stunting the growth of the wheat.

Herbicides, fungi, viruses and more. No one is ready to make an authoritative diagnosis. “Releasing information prematurely is going to create a lot of speculation,” says OSU weed specialist Dan Ball. Investigators would not release preliminary data to Oregon Business, saying they were afraid of having to do damage control if their speculation was wrong. One thing everyone is willing to speak to is whether this will happen again. The short answer seems to be yes. “We’re talking about multiple causes,” says Ball. “Farming is an inherently risky business... One thing is that it will make people more aware of conditions when they make herbicide applications.”

Growers face new challenges every day. In the past eight years, new strains of aggressive stripe rust, a type of fungus that thrives in wetter conditions, have hit Oregon wheat growers hard. This raises the question of whether the freak rain was indeed an outlier or rather a sign of things to come.

“One of the things climate models are showing is the increasing variability of climate,” says Mundt, stressing that it doesn’t necessarily mean more rain, just more unpredictability.



 

More Articles

How Oregon will survive the loss of Hanjin

March 2015
Friday, February 20, 2015
BY JOE CORTRIGHT | OB CONTRIBUTOR

"Shipping containers to Portland is like waiting for a bus that travels once a day."


Read more...

10 quotes explaining crisis at Port of Portland

The Latest
Friday, February 20, 2015
022015 port portland OBM-thumbBY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

The ongoing labor disputes at the Port of Portland came to a head two weeks ago when Hanjin, the container port's largest client, notified its customers it would be ending its direct route to Oregon.


Read more...

Beyond Bodegas

April 2015
Friday, March 27, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Five years in the making, the Portland Mercado — the city’s first Latino public market — will celebrate its grand opening April 11. A $3.5 million public-private partnership spearheaded by Hacienda CDC, the market will house 15 to 20 businesses in the food, retail and service sectors. It has some big-name funders, including the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation and JPMorgan Chase. The project goals are equally ambitious: to improve cross-cultural understanding, alleviate poverty and spur community economic development. 


Read more...

Nuclear fingerprints

March 2015
Tuesday, February 24, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

At Oregon State University, a 21st century version of the bad dream — nuclear terrorism — is alive and well. This winter, the Department of Nuclear Physics and Radiation Health Physics created a new interdisciplinary graduate emphasis in nuclear forensics, a Sherlock Holmes-sounding program that aims to identify how and where confiscated nuclear and radiological materials were created.


Read more...

Uncertainty about convention center hotel could cost Portland an NBA All-Star Game

The Latest
Wednesday, February 18, 2015
463545460BY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

NBA commissioner: "I would love to end up having an All-Star Game in Portland. It's really just a function of ensuring that we can fit in town."


Read more...

The 100 Best Companies to Work For in Oregon

March 2015
Thursday, February 26, 2015
BY KIM MOORE | OB RESEARCH EDITOR

Employment in Oregon is almost back up to prerecession levels — and employers are having to work harder to entice talented staff to join their ranks. This year’s 100 Best Companies to Work For in Oregon project showcases the kind of quality workplaces that foster happy employees. 


Read more...

Letting Go

April 2015
Friday, March 27, 2015
BY AMY MILSHTEIN

As baby boomers sell their businesses, too many forget the all-important succession plan.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS