Sponsored by George Fox University
Home Back Issues April 2011 Lincoln City diversifies its economy

Lincoln City diversifies its economy

| Print |  Email
Articles - April 2011
Wednesday, March 23, 2011
Article Index
Lincoln City diversifies its economy
Page 2
Page 3
Page 4
Page 5
Page 6
By the numbers

Lincoln City by the numbers

Business growth in Lincoln City is measured primarily with lodging industry numbers because the lodging industry is one of Lincoln City’s biggest employers. Hotel, motel and vacation room rentals for December 2010 were $1.9 million, up 12.4% over December 2009.

Despite the economic difficulties faced by the state and Lincoln County, the average wage in Lincoln City has risen 17% from $22,505 in 2003 to $26,290 in 2009, the most recent year for which the state has statistics. Within the hospitality industry alone, the average wage has risen 12% from $19,297 to $21,706 over the same period. Lincoln County added about 1,000 jobs during that time, though the city’s job growth has been basically flat since 2003. (See chart below.)

0411_LincolnCity_Graph01

Total payroll dollars grew from $116 million in 2003 to $135 million in 2009, though still not back to peak levels of 2008. (See chart below.)

0411_LincolnCity_Graph02

“Most of our businesses outside of the lodging industry are small businesses,” says Linda Roy, executive director of the Lincoln City Chamber of Commerce. “But I have noticed that our empty storefronts are now being filled. It’s slow going but a tanning salon just opened, a rock store that will sell agates is opening soon, and there’s a café/bistro going in on the main highway.” Tourism has bounced back, with a 2% increase in gross lodging receipts in 2010 (despite the rainy spring and summer), bringing the Lincoln City economy back to pre-recession levels.



 

Comments   

 
JDaschel
0 #1 Correction to your opening paragraphJDaschel 2011-03-28 09:16:13
There are at least 2 resident families in Lincoln City who drive electric vehicles, we own one of them. We are supporters of the EV charging stations not because we need them (we charge in our garages) but because there will be a large influx of EV-owners in the Willamette Valley in the next couple years, who will need a place for charging when they enjoy the coast. We welcome them to Lincoln City!
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Cathleen Shea
0 #2 Cathleen Shea 2011-03-29 17:31:11
NW Natural Gas awarded Lincoln City the "First Smart Energy City" award in April 2010.

The EPA rated Lincoln City a "Green Power Community" in 2009; one of only eight cities, nationwide, at the time.

City-Data.com says the median household income in Lincoln City was $6695 in 2008. The median salary for Oregon was over $50711.

QualityInfo.org, Oregon Employment Dept’s website, talks about wage inequality in Oregon. They say out of the $63 billion dollars earned in Oregon in 2009, much of that money went to high wage earners vs. minimum wage earners. A different story than Ms. Margulis' article begins to emerge.

COLA increases on my pension are 2-3% per year. Maybe 17% over the mentioned time span. Am I better off? What about the cost of inflation compared to salary increases?

What about infrastructure? Mr. Hawker threatened to cut off the water to five families on city water because "it's too expensive to repair the line that runs in front of their homes." God save anyone trying to run a business from their home when the water gets cut off.

There are a lot of "neat" projects that have been done in town. They are scattered projects that show no specific goal to the commitment of the long term needs of this city -- needs like a water system that doesn’t lose 30% of its water between the plant and the faucet.

If we keep talking about the surface things that draw people to this town, but do not address the needs of the full time citizens. There will be no town to visit for a vacation.

Thanks for writing the article. It made look up real facts about my town.
Quote | Report to administrator
 

More Articles

Why I became an Oregon angel investor

Guest Blog
Monday, July 14, 2014
AngelInvestBY TERRY "STARBUCKER" ST. MARIE

I really didn’t know that much about angel investing, but I did know a lot about the entrepreneurial spirit.


Read more...

Creating a culture of compliance

Business tips
Thursday, June 19, 2014
DataBY MONICA ENAND | GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

Nine tips for building habits among employees to respond when needed.


Read more...

Oregon Business wins awards

News
Monday, June 30, 2014

ASBPEOregon Business magazine won two silver awards for excellence in writing in the National American Society of Business Publication Editors Western region competition.


Read more...

Trends in business succession

News
Thursday, July 03, 2014
TrendsBY TED AUSTIN & MIKE BAELE | GUEST CONTRIBUTORS

The Office of Economic Analysis announced that Oregon is currently enjoying the strongest job growth since 2006. While this resurgence has been welcome, the lingering effects of the 2008 “Great Recession” continues to affect Oregon businesses, especially with regard to estate planning and business succession.


Read more...

Who said we should sell in May?

Contributed Blogs
Friday, July 18, 2014
BullMarketBY JASON NORRIS | OB GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

Back in May, we shared a common Wall Street quote about investing, “Sell in May and go away.” Fast forward to July and the most common question we have been getting from clients is, “When is the market pullback going to occur?”


Read more...

OB Video: Dress for Success

News
Wednesday, July 02, 2014
DFSOBY JESSICA RIDGWAY | OB WEB EDITOR

Dress for Success Oregon promotes the economic independence of disadvantaged women by providing professional attire, a network of support and career development tools.


Read more...

Updated: Disrupting innovation

News
Tuesday, July 08, 2014
070814 thumb disputive-innovationBY LINDA BAKER  | OB EDITOR

The New Yorker recently published a sharply worded critique of “disruptive innovation,” one of the most widely cited theories in the business world today. The article raises questions about the descriptive value of disruption and innovation  — whether the terms are mere buzzwords or actually explain today's extraordinarily complex and fast changing business environment. 

Update: We caught up with Portland's Thomas Thurston, who shared his data driven take on the disruption controversy.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS