Lincoln City diversifies its economy

| Print |  Email
Articles - April 2011
Wednesday, March 23, 2011
0411_LincolnCity_04
Mixed-use projects have been part of the downtown plan. At the Driftwood Estates, all the condo units have been sold and all the commercial space has been leased.
Over the past 12 years, the glass foundry (built in 2005), the Community Center (upgraded to include a fitness facility and rock climbing wall in 2005), and Lincoln City’s skate park (first built in 1999 and renovated several times since) were all established with public money and private business people working together. Like many of the thriving places in Lincoln City, they represent a collaboration between business, government and motivated residents. In 1999, city officials held a focus group with community stakeholders in the Taft District as well as residents to devise a plan for redevelopment. Instead of lasting two hours, this focus group lasted for six months and became a model for urban planning for the city. “We all want a healthy community,” says Linda Roy, executive director of the Lincoln City Chamber of Commerce. “The collaboration makes it so we’re not all duplicating the same thing.”

When Portland-based developer Sergey Kashubin approached the city in 2007 for permission to build condominiums in the Oceanlake district in the center of town, the area he wanted to develop had been identified for commercial use. Olsen suggested they do both. The city would loan Kashubin $50,000 at no interest and fund a plan redesign if he agreed to lift the building 10 feet to put commercial space on the ground floor with residential units above. The result was the Driftwood Estates on NW 15th Street. Kashubin paid back the loan early and the two commercial units sold first, in 2008, one to a real estate agency and one to a Portland-based artist. The larger vision is to make the downtown Oceanlake district, which has the majority of retail stores as well as a movie theater and several eateries, more pedestrian friendly. With beach access at the end of the street, the mixed use has encouraged more tourism beyond the beach, bringing Highway 101 traffic into the district.

 



 

Comments   

 
JDaschel
0 #1 Correction to your opening paragraphJDaschel 2011-03-28 09:16:13
There are at least 2 resident families in Lincoln City who drive electric vehicles, we own one of them. We are supporters of the EV charging stations not because we need them (we charge in our garages) but because there will be a large influx of EV-owners in the Willamette Valley in the next couple years, who will need a place for charging when they enjoy the coast. We welcome them to Lincoln City!
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Cathleen Shea
0 #2 Cathleen Shea 2011-03-29 17:31:11
NW Natural Gas awarded Lincoln City the "First Smart Energy City" award in April 2010.

The EPA rated Lincoln City a "Green Power Community" in 2009; one of only eight cities, nationwide, at the time.

City-Data.com says the median household income in Lincoln City was $6695 in 2008. The median salary for Oregon was over $50711.

QualityInfo.org, Oregon Employment Dept’s website, talks about wage inequality in Oregon. They say out of the $63 billion dollars earned in Oregon in 2009, much of that money went to high wage earners vs. minimum wage earners. A different story than Ms. Margulis' article begins to emerge.

COLA increases on my pension are 2-3% per year. Maybe 17% over the mentioned time span. Am I better off? What about the cost of inflation compared to salary increases?

What about infrastructure? Mr. Hawker threatened to cut off the water to five families on city water because "it's too expensive to repair the line that runs in front of their homes." God save anyone trying to run a business from their home when the water gets cut off.

There are a lot of "neat" projects that have been done in town. They are scattered projects that show no specific goal to the commitment of the long term needs of this city -- needs like a water system that doesn’t lose 30% of its water between the plant and the faucet.

If we keep talking about the surface things that draw people to this town, but do not address the needs of the full time citizens. There will be no town to visit for a vacation.

Thanks for writing the article. It made look up real facts about my town.
Quote | Report to administrator
 

More Articles

Dan and Louis Oyster Bar opens up to a changing neighborhood

The Latest
Thursday, December 11, 2014
121114-oystervidBy MEGHAN NOLT

VIDEO: Revamping a Classic — an iconic eatery stays relevant in a changing marketplace.


Read more...

OB Poll: Wineries and groceries

News
Friday, October 24, 2014

24-winethumbA majority of respondents agreed: Local vineyards should remain Oregon-owned and quality is the most important factor when determining where to eat or buy groceries.


Read more...

The 100 Best Companies survey is open

News
Friday, October 24, 2014

100-best-logo-2015 500pxw-1How does your workplace stack up against competitors? How can you improve workplace practices to help recruit and retain employees? Find out by taking our 100 Best Companies to Work for in Oregon survey!


Read more...

Healthcare pullback

News
Thursday, November 20, 2014
112014-boehnercare-thumbBY JASON NORRIS | OB CONTRIBUTOR

Each month for Oregon Business, we assess factors that are shaping current capital market activity—and what they mean to investors. Here we take a look at two major developments regarding possible rollbacks of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).


Read more...

Tackling the CEO-worker pay gap

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014
BY OREGON BUSINESS STAFF

An SEC rule targets the disparity between executive and employee compensation, reigniting a long-standing debate about corporate social responsibility.


Read more...

Corner Office: Pam Edstrom

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

Seven tidbits of information from an agency partner and co-founder of Waggener Edstrom in Lake Oswego.


Read more...

The short list: 4 companies engaged in a battle of the paddles

The Latest
Thursday, December 04, 2014
pingpongthumbBY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Nothing says startup culture like a ping pong table in the office, lounge or lobby.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS