Asian investors eye Oregon properties, green cards

| Print |  Email
Articles - April 2011
Tuesday, March 22, 2011
0411_AsianMoney_03
James Mei opened one of the first American law offices in China. // PHOTO BY LEAH NASH
Chen’s attorney and golf buddy, Davis Wright Tremaine partner James Mei, has been bridging the gap between China and Oregon for more than two decades. He moved to Oregon from Shanghai in 1985 and attended Willamette University, graduating with a law degree in 1989. He joined Davis Wright Tremaine in 1993 and helped it become one of the first American law firms to establish an office in China. From there he helped Nike close its first equity deal in China and worked with key Oregon companies such as Lattice Semiconductor and Tektronix as well as top global businesses such as Ford Motors, Intel, Microsoft and Starbucks.

Most of the early deals Mei worked on involved helping American companies to gain a foothold in China, manufacturing products at first and later selling them in China as Chinese buying power grew.

With time the money began flowing in both directions. “After years of attracting investment and double-digit growth, the Chinese shifted to outbound investment,” Mei says. State-owned Chinese powerhouses led the way, followed by smaller private groups such as Chen’s investors.

Mei has experience with the EB-5 program — he worked with a Taiwanese investor seven years ago to navigate the system and obtain green cards for his family — and he sees the logic behind the renewed interest in the program. In his view it grows from powerful trends: the lingering credit crunch that makes it hard to finance projects without new sources of money; the rising value of the Chinese currency driving greater buying power; an improved bureaucratic process for attracting foreign investment driven by need; and China’s one-child policy and the determination among the newly rich Chinese to get the absolute best for their children, including access to education in the U.S.

But the most important factor, as Mei sees it, is business acumen. “More and more people in China can afford to do this because they have achieved so much success,” he says. “They know how to make money.”

Mei traveled to China recently to meet with three huge Chinese firms interested in building high-speed rail lines connecting Los Angeles and Las Vegas, Los Angeles and San Francisco, and Eugene and Seattle. He notes that Chinese engineers have completed more than 5,000 miles of tracks, giving China the largest high-speed rail network in the world. By comparison, the ongoing planning process for high-speed rail projects in the United States is expected to last about 25 years.

 



 

Comments   

 
China Man
-1 #1 ChinaChina Man 2011-03-28 14:50:27
Yup. Won't be long CHINA will own the whole USA.
Opps, they do now..

Why doesn't our government step in and help the people of the USA..Instead of offering deals to other countries. Ya Right
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Karen Williams
0 #2 Karen Williams, Carroll Community Investments LLCKaren Williams 2011-04-01 17:15:59
Mr. Jacklet gives us too much credit! John Carroll, Bill McCrae and I been privileged to participate in projects we care about, all of which took the efforts of many talented people. Community development is complex and rewarding work, but above all else, it's teamwork. While we hope we were able to make meaningful contributions, the projects got done because of the creativity and leadership of many people from the public and private sectors.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Rick Waible
-1 #3 Hey China Man with the comment on 3-28Rick Waible 2011-04-20 07:12:03
I was born and raised right here on Oregon. I have served in the US Army and am as patriotic as it gets.....to a point. The US has changed to a culture of sissy laws where we cannot discipline our children or we lose them, our kids are living in a world of sloth habits, most playing video games and not building tree forts and having rock fights. The boy in a bubble race that sues for gain rather than getting up and working for a living. The handout free money every week to buy alcohol, junk food, and depression meds is sitting back and making a population of garbage humans. I say if China can come from poverty/3rd world conditons, and its population is working its way to wealth, and they want to spend it here on assets we were too stupid to hold....go for it China, it seems the US is going to need a sugar daddy.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
0 #4 Real estateGuest 2014-07-14 11:35:56
It seems that Asians see a lot of potential in Oregon property. There are a lot of good things about it.


real estate licence course http://www.pioneertraining.org/
Quote | Report to administrator
 

More Articles

The Private 150: From Strength to Strength

July/August 2015
Monday, July 13, 2015
BY KIM MOORE

Revenues in Oregon's private, for profit sector maintained solid growth as the economy continued to rebound.


Read more...

Grain Food

September 2015
Wednesday, August 19, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

A Power Lunch at Bob's Red Mill Whole Grain Store and Restaurant.


Read more...

Child care challenge

News
Wednesday, August 26, 2015
0927OHSUhealthystarts-thumbBY KIM MOORE AND LINDA BAKER

Child care in Oregon is expensive and hard to find. We delved into the numbers and talked to a few executives and managers about day care costs, accessibility and work-life balance.


Read more...

Staffing Challenge

July/August 2015
Monday, July 13, 2015
BY KIM MOORE

A conversation with Greg Lambert, president of Mid Oregon Personnel Services.


Read more...

Up on the Roof

September 2015
Wednesday, August 19, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER

In 2010 Vanessa Keitges and several investors purchased Portland-based Columbia Green Technologies, a green-roof company. The 13-person firm has a 200% annual growth rate, exports 30% of its product to Canada and received its first infusion of venture capital in 2014 from Yaletown Venture Partners. CEO Keitges, 40, a Southern Oregon native who serves on President Obama’s Export Council, talks about market innovation, scaling small business and why Oregon is falling behind in green-roof construction. 


Read more...

Best Foot Forward

July/August 2015
Monday, July 13, 2015
BY CHRIS NOBLE

Whether you're stepping out to work or onto the track, Pacific Northwest shoe companies have you covered.


Read more...

Unshakable

September 2015
Wednesday, August 19, 2015
BY BRIAN LIBBY

Ben Kaiser holds his ground.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS