Want greatness? Listen up

| Print |  Email
Articles - March 2011
Wednesday, March 02, 2011

Our 100 Best Companies project turns 18 this year, quite a milestone not only for the magazine but for the many companies and employees who have participated in the survey. In just the past eight years, 190,000 employees from 936 companies have taken the free, anonymous survey that ranks their satisfaction with their workplaces.

That is an enormous wellspring of information about what it takes to be a great place to work. Last year overall scores were down, largely because of diminished benefits. But this year the overall scores climbed back up a bit.

What were the most important workplace practices for the employees who took the survey this year? At the top of the list was treatment by their direct supervisor. After that came compensation (pay, benefits, bonuses, paid time off); trust in top management to make ethical business decisions; trust between managers and employees; and pride and belief in the company.
Four out of five of the workplace qualities that are most important to employees have nothing to do with financial rewards. That is a powerful insight. A great company is built on great leadership and management. Admittedly, that’s a lot harder to do than just offering good health insurance. But if you think you don’t have a chance to be ranked as one of the 100 Best Companies to Work For in Oregon because you don’t offer swanky perks or pay top dollar, you’re wrong. Employees overwhelmingly care more about being treated with respect and trust, and working for a company that they feel good about when they walk through the doors every day.

Untitled Document


In this issue we look inside a handful of these successful companies to see what that leadership looks like for those businesses. Places such as Stumptown Coffee, which offers free tattoos at its Christmas parties, or Ruby Receptionist, which provides yoga to help relieve the stress of the workday. Throughout the stories you will find inspiration, and some practical advice if you’re looking for ways to make your company better. (And how much more practical than free tattoos do you need?)

We believe so deeply in the importance of best practices for business success that we created two new 100 Best projects. In June we announce the third annual 100 Best Green Companies to Work For, based on sustainability questions that were asked in this year’s 100 Best Companies and last year’s 100 Best Nonprofits surveys. In October, we announce our third annual 100 Best Nonprofits to Work For in Oregon.

If you didn’t participate this year, I hope you do next year. There is much to learn from the 100 Best. But more importantly, there is much to learn from the people who make your company possible. Are you prepared to listen?

robin-BLOG

 

 

 

Robin Doussard

 

More Articles

Is there life beyond Reed?

September 2015
Wednesday, August 19, 2015
BY GARY THILL | PHOTOS BY JASON E. KAPLAN

A storied institution climbs down from the ivory tower.


Read more...

Money Troubles

September 2015
Thursday, August 20, 2015
BY DAN COOK

The state’s angel investing fund gets hammered in Salem.


Read more...

Business partnerships: taming the three-headed monster

Contributed Blogs
Monday, July 06, 2015
070615-businessmarriagefail-thumbBY KATHERINE HEEKIN | OB GUEST COLUMNIST

Picking a business partner is not much different than choosing a spouse or life partner, and the business break-up can be as heart-wrenching and costly as divorce.


Read more...

Fueling Up for the Climb

July/August 2015
Friday, July 10, 2015
BY GREGG MORRIS

Rita Hansen aims to scale natural gas vehicle innovation.


Read more...

Reader Input: School Choice

September 2015
Thursday, August 20, 2015

Which of the following would be most effective in reducing the cost of operating a public university in Oregon?


Read more...

Flattery with Numbers

July/August 2015
Friday, July 10, 2015
BY JOE CORTRIGHT

The false promise of economic impact statements.


Read more...

Up on the Roof

September 2015
Wednesday, August 19, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER

In 2010 Vanessa Keitges and several investors purchased Portland-based Columbia Green Technologies, a green-roof company. The 13-person firm has a 200% annual growth rate, exports 30% of its product to Canada and received its first infusion of venture capital in 2014 from Yaletown Venture Partners. CEO Keitges, 40, a Southern Oregon native who serves on President Obama’s Export Council, talks about market innovation, scaling small business and why Oregon is falling behind in green-roof construction. 


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS