Jobs bill gets little support in Salem

| Print |  Email
Articles - March 2011
Wednesday, March 02, 2011

0311_JobsBillOregon offers tax credits to e-commerce businesses, movie producers, rural physicians and homeowners who buy wood pellet stoves. But a proposal to attack stubbornly high unemployment rates by providing incentives to people who create new jobs is gaining little bipartisan support in Salem.

House Bill 3053 would offer qualifying employers a $3,000 tax credit for each job created. The new employee would need to be previously unemployed and remain in the job for at least a year. Employers must prove they have been doing business in Oregon for at least two years and that the new hire is resulting in a net increase in jobs at the company.

“It makes common sense,” says Rep. Kevin Cameron (R-Salem). “It doesn’t cost the state a dime until someone gets hired. These are real people on the ground, going to work tomorrow, who are going to pay income taxes.”

Republican lawmakers are pushing the tax credits as part of a multi-pronged strategy to make the state friendlier to business. Cameron says he has received significant support for the idea from business owners. “I’ve heard from many people who are struggling or just hanging on and are waiting for that extra little incentive that will get them to hire someone.”

Democratic Senate president Peter Courtney has voiced support for direct incentives for job creation in the past. But few of his party colleagues have voiced support for HB 3053 this year. Rep Tobias Read (D-Beaverton), co-chair of the transportation and economic development committee, says the program would be ripe for abuse. “The problem is, you can’t ever tell whether you are unnecessarily subsidizing something that would have happened anyhow.”

Read says Democrats are taking a cautious approach to tax credits given the challenge of simply providing basic services. “Every dollar we authorize in tax credits is a dollar that we don’t spend on education,” says Read.

A recent state report examines a dizzying assortment of tax credits including a biomass tax credit that is costing the state $14.6 million in the current biennium, a tax break for people who donate to the Trust for Cultural Development ($7.2 million) and the mother of them all, the business energy tax credit ($185 million). At $3,000 per job, $185 million would equate to 61,667 jobs.

BEN JACKLET
 

Comments   

 
Matthew
0 #1 Matthew 2011-03-07 10:29:27
So, if a business hires a full-time, minimum wage worker (
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Aly
0 #2 Job takers and job creatorsAly 2011-03-18 14:36:20
People take minimum wage jobs because they are better than the jobs that they have provided for themselves. We have created minimum wage jobs and every single one of those employees always gets paid before we do, and rarely do they stay at the min wage level. Most do well and progress up the pay ladder. For young people and the inexperienced it is a big risk for an employer to hire them. Incentives for hiring at any level would be welcome by actual job creators.
Quote | Report to administrator
 

More Articles

Downtime

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY JESSICA RIDGWAY

Bob Dethlefs, CEO of Evanta, balances work and play.


Read more...

Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


Read more...

The Bookseller

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY AMY MILSHTEIN

Everyone knows college is expensive, but a look at the numbers brings that into sharp — and painful — focus.


Read more...

Corner Office: Sheree Arntson

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

Checking in with the managing director of Arnerich Massena.


Read more...

Election Season

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014

We didn’t intend this issue to have an election season theme. But politics has a way of seeping into the cracks and fissures.


Read more...

Crowdfunding 2.0

News
Tuesday, December 02, 2014
120214-crowdfund-thumbBY LINDA BAKER

A conversation with attorney Erich Merrill about the latest way to raise money from large groups of people.


Read more...

Corner Office: Marv LaPorte

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

The president of LaPorte & Associates lets us in on his day-to-day life.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS