Profiles of the 2011 100 Best Companies to Work For in Oregon

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Articles - March 2011
Tuesday, March 01, 2011

 

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Autodesk prides itself on treating its employees like Pamela Adams well; and part of that means bringing Stella to work.
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A perk of working at Autodesk: the company’s technology is behind some pretty cool innovations, including the video games Guitar Hero and Rock Band. Employee Shivakumar Sundaram rocks out in the Lake Oswego office.
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Yes, Autodesk employees can bring their dogs to work and also get discounted pet insurance. From left: Royden Chick with Reggie; Stan Mora with Maggie; Brian Repp with Nico and Lena; Roxie Hecker with Lulu; and Claudia Wood with Simon. // Photos by Teresa Meier

For employees of AUTODESK (NO. 31 BEST LARGE COMPANY), the sheer coolness of some of the work they do may be enough to have earned the company repeated spots on the 100 Best list.

A design, engineering and entertainment software firm whose manufacturing industry group calls Lake Oswego home, Autodesk software helped design professionals conjure up the Shanghai Tower, a spacey, 2,000-foot skyscraper currently under construction in China. The company’s first-ever iPhone application, SketchBook Mobile, is one of Apple’s most popular, and Autodesk technology was behind much of the colorful world and creatures in James Cameron’s epic film Avatar, the highest-grossing movie of all time.

“I think our employees are proud to work for a company developing cool and innovative technology that makes a difference in the world,” says Buzz Kross, senior vice president of Autodesk’s manufacturing industry group.

About 170 Autodesk employees work in Lake Oswego, nearly all of them involved in software development or product management. According to Kross, Autodesk provides tools and opportunities for professional development and encourages every employee to forge their own careers.

“The sky is the limit,” he says.

In addition, Autodesk honors and rewards its technological innovators through a patent incentive program, lets employees bring their dogs to work, reimburses for fitness club memberships and offers benefits to bicycle commuters. And on top of that, all employees are eligible for a six-week paid sabbatical every four years.

“The sabbatical program is unique because it is embedded in our culture,” Kross says. “People come back refreshed and motivated and say this is one of their favorite benefits.”

 

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Comments   

 
Gern Blenston
+1 #1 Great Photos!Gern Blenston 2011-03-12 10:23:03
Whoever this Eric Naslund guy is, his work just rocks! The one of Matt Lonsbury is just epic.
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