The 2011 List: Top 33 Small Companies to Work For in Oregon

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Articles - March 2011
Tuesday, March 01, 2011

0311_100BestIntro

Our annual ranking of the 100 Best Companies to Work For in Oregon turns 18 this year with nearly 14,000 employees participating. Oregon Business research editor Brandon Sawyer and DHM Research calculated the rankings based on employee surveys and a benefits report from each company.

The small size category is comprised of the top 33 highest-scoring companies with 15-34 Oregon employees.



 

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