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Hot and cold energy

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Articles - March 2011
Tuesday, March 01, 2011
0311_NextWithout sufficient storage capabilities, alternative energy is inconsistent and unreliable. Richard Peterson, professor of mechanical engineering at Oregon State University, is developing a thermal energy storage system that competes with current energy storage methods. Today, water and batteries are among the most common storage methods. Water can be pumped from a low elevation to a high elevation and then released when energy is needed, but this method relies on geographic features of the land such as mountains or hills and requires a large area; batteries use chemical reactions to store and release energy but are expensive. Thermal energy storage systems have been considered impractical because they are inefficient, but Peterson’s system changes that by storing energy in tanks in the form of “ice slurry.” As the ice melts the energy that is released is recaptured and used. Heat expelled from geothermal sources or industrial manufacturing plants can be incorporated into the process to make the system as efficient as other energy storage systems. “We could integrate into business enterprises that have a source of waste heat readily available,” Peterson says. The storage system can be scaled to fit large power plants, wind farms or private businesses.
CORY MIMMS
 

Comments   

 
Walter Want
0 #1 Green Energy and WasteWalter Want 2011-03-23 11:26:57
I know that a lot of methane gas is burned off at St Johns Landfill. Why not convert this energy into electricity as a renewable resource instead of CO2
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Paul Valenta
0 #2 Thermal Energy Storage Systems are Efficient!Paul Valenta 2011-03-29 05:38:01
Today's Thermal Energy Storage Systems are very efficient. I completely disagree with the author's statement, "Thermal energy storage systems have been considered impractical because they are inefficient....

Thermal Energy Storage systems of today are part of hybrid cooling systems that lower the connected load by right sizing the cooling system. These Hybrid cooling systems that use thermal energy storage can use water, ice, or ice slurry as a medium. Hybrid cooling systems that use thermal energy storage have synergies with cooling systems that allow them to operate more efficiently as a system. Pumping colder temperatures with more btuh's means lower flow which save fan and pump energy. Charging of the storage occurs at night. Night time electricity is typically more efficiently generated and more efficiently transported and it renewable energy component is increasing. Creating a load renewable energy is key to their viability.

Google Fossil Ridge School ice storage, part of the Poudre School District, or Credit Suisse ice storage, or Bank of America Tower ice storage. They are saving energy and storage using thermal energy storage.

To have a blanket statement that thermal energy storage systems are impractical an inefficient is to say the ice slurry form of thermal energy storage is inefficient too. It makes no sense.
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Guest
0 #3 BHATNAGAR V SGuest 2012-09-13 00:41:22
I would like to understand if Heat is energy then what is cold? is it also an energy?
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