Mixed success for manufacturing jobs

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Articles - February 2011
Thursday, January 27, 2011

Among the 20 manufacturing industries in the state, computer and electronic manufacturing continued to employ the most people, 35,272, and pay the highest average salary, $90,662, in 2009. However, the industry lost 13.4% of its jobs since 2004. Wood product manufacturing fared even worse: Employment declined 34.9% over those five years, bumping wood from second to third in jobs.

On the plus side, food manufacturing grew employment 5.5%, moving it up to second place, though it averaged only $33,547 per year in pay. Beverage and tobacco manufacturing showed stronger growth, +30.6%, and paid a little better, $35,557. The other industries making gains were primary metals, miscellaneous, and leather and allied products. Transportation equipment declined the most, -40.3%, followed by furniture and related products, -35.1%. Compared to 2009, total manufacturing employment (as of November 2010) dropped another 3.4% to 161,973 jobs.

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BRANDON SAWYER
 

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