Home Back Issues January 2011 Chocolate business stays sweet

Chocolate business stays sweet

| Print |  Email
Articles - January 2011
Thursday, December 16, 2010
Artisanal chocolateThe race to create the most creative artisanal chocolate might finally be over: a chocolate stuffed with pig’s blood.

After having dinner at a restaurant serving a pig’s blood-based carbonara, David Briggs, owner of Xocolatl de David, a Portland-based artisan chocolate wholesaler, saved the idea and incorporated it into his chocolate. “The chocolate is more modeled after a bread pudding or blood sausage,” Briggs says.

The chocolate industry, already having shown strength during a shaky economy, continues to see creative energy among small artisan shops where a personalized touch can be found in the product.

Sarah Hart, owner of Alma Chocolates, a Portland shop opened in 2006 that has gained national attention, also credits the low cost of setting up a chocolate business. Alma Chocolates specializes in custom-molded confections gilded with edible gold leaf. “I started doing custom-mould pieces because at that point there were just really bad moldings,” says Hart.

Pig’s blood and gold-dusted crosses might make it in Portland, but apparently not in McMinnville.

“Playing with exotic ingredients doesn’t fly so well in this area,” says Dana Dooley of Honest Chocolates, which opened in 2004. At Honest, the tastes run more toward wine and fruit. It currently works with 35 area wineries, providing chocolates for wine pairings.

“We’re seeing more growth in the fine segment because the American palate is getting more educated,” says Mary Jo Stojak of the Fine Chocolate Industry Association. Even though the price is higher for premium chocolates, “It’s still cheaper than buying a TV or a new dress.” she says.

MAX GELBER
 

More Articles

The Diaspora

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
BY LEE VAN DER VOO

Former newspaper reporters move into brand journalism.


Read more...

Innovation: a critique

News
Wednesday, October 08, 2014
1008 innovation thumbBY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

A Design Week panel discussion raises questions about how innovative we really are.


Read more...

Downtime

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
BY JESSICA RIDGWAY

I'm not very interesting,” says a modest Ray Di Carlo, CEO and executive producer of Bent Image Labs, an animation and visual effects studio.


Read more...

A Complex Portrait: Immigration, Jobs and the Economy

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY JOE ROJAS-BURKE & KIM MOORE

Oregon Business reports on the visa squeeze, the skills gap and foreign-born residents who are revitalizing rural Oregon.


Read more...

Knight Vision

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
BY VIVIAN MCINERNY

Travis Knight wants to release a movie a year. Can he pull it off?


Read more...

Water World

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY KIM MOORE

Fred Ziari aims to feed the global population.


Read more...

The Backstory

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014

In our cover story this month, Wendy Collie, CEO of New Seasons Market, and Kim Malek, owner of Salt & Straw, discuss their rapidly growing businesses and Portland’s red hot food scene. The conversation provides an interesting lens through which to explore trends in the grocery store and restaurant sectors.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS