November 2010

Geothermal investments heat up

| Print |  Email
Articles - November 2010
Thursday, October 21, 2010
1110_ATS07The ongoing construction of a $124 million geothermal plant near Neal Hot Springs was made possible by a $102 million Department of Energy loan this summer, the largest of its kind given to a geothermal project in the country. The DOE investment and other proposed government incentives are making geothermal development in the state more feasible after years of complications from large overhead costs and environmental concerns.
 

David Evans gets NOAA contract

| Print |  Email
Articles - November 2010
Thursday, October 21, 2010
Big deals, mergers and transactions of the month.
 

Injury ends football career, but leads to innovation

| Print |  Email
Articles - November 2010
Thursday, October 21, 2010
1110_ATS03The pro football draft day of 1994 was the worst day of Brian Cassidy’s life. Once ranked among the top prospects in the nation, Cassidy watched as player after player was drafted and he was overlooked.
 

Oregon draws from California, exports to Washington

| Print |  Email
Articles - November 2010
Thursday, October 21, 2010

1110_ATS02Oregon gained about 75,000 more residents than it lost from 2003-2008 with Californians accounting for the lion’s share of immigrants.

 

Projects spark energy in Eugene

| Print |  Email
Articles - November 2010
Thursday, October 21, 2010
1110_ATS01City efforts to reduce barriers to construction along with some substantial loans to downtown projects have helped boost Eugene’s economy.
 

Noble Coffee prospers in Ashland

| Print |  Email
Articles - November 2010
Thursday, October 21, 2010
1110_Tactics02Noble Coffee Roasting in Ashland has built its success on sustainable ethics and a reverence for quality.
 

Readers share recovery ideas

| Print |  Email
Articles - November 2010
Thursday, October 21, 2010
1110_InputGraph03Problems continue to plague Oregon's economy. Here's how 704 of our readers ranked ways to help the recovery in a survey conducted in late September by research partner CFM Strategic Communications.
 
More Articles...
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 Next > End >>

Page 3 of 4

More Articles

Corner Office: Marv LaPorte

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

The president of LaPorte & Associates lets us in on his day-to-day life.


Read more...

Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


Read more...

Leading with the right brain

News
Tuesday, December 09, 2014
120914-manderson-thumbBY LINDA BAKER

On the eve of the Portland Ad Federation's Rosey Awards, Matt Anderson, CEO of Struck, talks about the transition from creative director to CEO, the Portland talent pool and whether data is the new black in the creative services sector.


Read more...

Justice for All

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014
BY JESSICA RIDGWAY

Lawger upends the typical hourly based fee model by letting clients determine the cost.


Read more...

Top stories in 2014

The Latest
Thursday, December 18, 2014
10-listthumb

2014 was a year of wild contradictions, fast-paced growth and unexpected revelations.


Read more...

Corner Office: Sheree Arntson

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

Checking in with the managing director of Arnerich Massena.


Read more...

Corner Office: Timothy Mitchell

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

A look-in on the life of Norris & Stevens' president.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS