Sponsored by Lane Powell

Counties, timber company exchange property

| Print |  Email
Articles - November 2010
Thursday, October 21, 2010


Private land in Lincoln, Benton and Polk counties has been exchanged for state land to allow for better road placement and easier management. // PHOTO COURTESY OF OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY

After almost two years of negotiations, Corvallis-based Starker Forests will exchange 2,095 acres of land in Lincoln, Benton and Polk counties for 1,904 acres of state-owned land. Exchanging small pieces of land gets rid of jigsaw-puzzle property lines, which allows for better road placement, says Marc Vomocil, spokesman for the timber company.

Both parties feel the exchange will make management of the land easier. The city of Cannon Beach also entered into negotiations with the Department of Forestry in 2008 concerning 805 acres of land.
Vomocil says a similar exchange between two private companies could have been completed in six to 12 months. Additional appraisals and public hearings slow the process. Also, counties must have a balanced value of land traded because they receive some of the revenue generated by the land.

“Patience is the key,” says Mike Totey of the Department of Forestry.

Land negotiations are a balancing act. The value of the timber and the land are the major concerns, but biological assessments and recreational value must also be considered. Third-party appraisals must be used to ensure a fair assessment, and they aren’t cheap. The Cannon Beach exchange cost approximately $70,000. Then, to ensure the state doesn’t lose valuable mineral deposits, what lies beneath the forest must be considered. Final approval has to go through the state land board because it owns the mineral rights.

After the appraisals are completed, the negotiations begin. In the Starker Forests exchange, the state’s land was valued at over   $1.1 million more than Starker’s land. Timber will compensate the state for the loss and will have to be harvested within seven years, a stipulation of the contract. In the Cannon Beach exchange, the city will pay the state $51,000 to make up the difference.

Everyone involved is glad the negotiations are coming to a close. “It’s one less project on my desk,” Vomocil says. “We’ll be able to reap the benefits of the consolidation.”


More Articles

Video: 100 Best Nonprofits to Work For in Oregon 2015

The Latest
Monday, October 05, 2015
100-best-NP-logo-2015-video-thumbVIDEO BY JESSE LARSON

Profiling some of the organizations featured in the 2015 list.


One Tough Mayor

October 2015
Monday, September 28, 2015

Betty Roppe steers Prineville into the future.


The God complex

Linda Baker
Wednesday, September 30, 2015
093015-zydellren-thumbBY LINDA BAKER | EDITOR

The media coverage about Pope Francis must have put me in a Biblical frame of mind. Because after touring the latest phase of the South Waterfront development, a mind boggling 1.5 million square feet of office and retail space that will spring up north of the aerial tram over the next few years, I couldn’t stop thinking about the massive project as a modern day creation story.


Baby. Boom!

September 2015
Wednesday, August 26, 2015

A new co-working model disrupts office sharing, child care and work-life balance as we know it.


Reader Input: In or Out

October 2015
Wednesday, September 30, 2015

The refugee crisis has put immigration and border issues on the front burner, in Europe and at home. In Oregon, attitudes toward illegal immigration haven’t changed dramatically since 2006.


New green wood building product takes off in Oregon

Thursday, September 10, 2015
091115-cltjohnson-thumbBY KIM MOORE

Oregon is set to become a hub of a new type of wooden building design as a southern Oregon timber company becomes the first certified manufacturer of a high-tech wood product, known as cross-laminated timber, or CLT.


Social media transforming sports business

The Latest
Thursday, September 24, 2015

The traditional model of sports teams using paid media to get their message across is disappearing as teams look instead to social media to interact with fans.

Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02