Staycations boost fairs and festivals

| Print |  Email
Articles - October 2010
Tuesday, September 28, 2010
1010_ATS09
The Oregon State fair in Salem posted a 15% gain in attendance this year, one of several fairs and festivals that saw business growth. // PHOTO COURTESY OF OREGON STATE FAIR

Many of Oregon’s largest festivals and fairs reached record-breaking attendance this summer, a sign that many Oregonians decided on staycations this year.

Attendance at the Oregon State Fair in Salem reached almost 400,000, up 15% from 2009. County fairs also did well despite budget cuts of about $14,000 each since 2008. The Tillamook County Fair set a record with more than 74,000 in attendance. One down note was sounded by the Oregon Country Fair, where attendance dropped 9% over last year, the lowest attendance since 2005.

The fairs weren’t the only winners this year. The Safeway Waterfront Blues Festival in Portland received almost $650,000 in donations, the highest ever, and the Oregon Shakespeare Festival in Ashland operated at 94% capacity with approximately 415,000 in attendance. “We are doing a good job connecting with Oregonians,” says Shakespeare Festival spokesman Bob Hackett, adding that Oregonians are about 35% of the audience.

Many Oregonians stayed closer to home this year or took road trips within the state, says Michelle Godfrey with the Oregon Tourism Commission. The commission uses online advertising and has regional marketing campaigns in Washington and California but also targets Oregonians. Mid-summer lodging occupancy rates were up 2.5% compared to 2009, but the number of rooms rented to in-state residents is unknown.

The fairs and festivals give Oregonians a fun activity to attend close to home without spending money on airfare. With the economy still troubling many regions around the state, “People can’t leave,” says Jerry Underwood, president of the Oregon Fair Association.

CORY MIMMS
 

More Articles

OB Poll: Wineries and groceries

News
Friday, October 24, 2014

24-winethumbA majority of respondents agreed: Local vineyards should remain Oregon-owned and quality is the most important factor when determining where to eat or buy groceries.


Read more...

The short list: Holiday habits of six Oregon CEOs

The Latest
Thursday, December 11, 2014
121214-xmaslist1BY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

We ask business and nonprofit leaders how they survive the season.


Read more...

Powerbook Perspective

January-Powerbook 2015
Friday, December 12, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

A conversation with Oregon state economist Josh Lehner.


Read more...

Crowdfunding 2.0

News
Tuesday, December 02, 2014
120214-crowdfund-thumbBY LINDA BAKER

A conversation with attorney Erich Merrill about the latest way to raise money from large groups of people.


Read more...

Growing a mobility cluster

News
Friday, October 31, 2014
0414 bikes bd2f6052BY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

Why are there so few transportation startups in Portland?  The city’s leadership in bike, transit and pedestrian transportation has been well-documented.  But that was then — when government and nonprofits paved the way for a new, less auto centric way of life.


Read more...

Legislative Preview: A Shifting Balance

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014
BY APRIL STREETER

Democratic gains pave the way for a revival of environment and labor bills as revenue reform languishes.


Read more...

Leading with the right brain

News
Tuesday, December 09, 2014
120914-manderson-thumbBY LINDA BAKER

On the eve of the Portland Ad Federation's Rosey Awards, Matt Anderson, CEO of Struck, talks about the transition from creative director to CEO, the Portland talent pool and whether data is the new black in the creative services sector.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS