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Oregon workers cheaper than most

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Articles - October 2010
Tuesday, September 28, 2010

Average annual pay for private sector employees

Despite a minimum wage adjusted for inflation each year since 2004, Oregon experienced the smallest percentage gain in private sector pay between 2001 and 2009 when compared to neighboring states — 22.1% versus Nevada’s 27.7%. During the same period, the seasonally adjusted U.S. Consumer Price Index grew 21.1%, so Oregon wages barely beat inflation. In 2009, though, average private sector pay fell 1.6% in Nevada and 0.5% nationwide, while Oregon wages remained flat. Still, Oregon has the lowest average pay of all its neighbors except Idaho. In 2009, the average non-government Oregon employee earned 21.1% and 11.4% less respectively than counterparts in California and the U.S. overall. Meanwhile, employee benefit costs, especially health premiums, are eating up more of the compensation pie: Benefits accounted for 29% of total compensation in the first quarter of 2004. By the first quarter of 2010 they grew to 30.4%.

BRANDON SAWYER
 

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Aaron Douglas
0 #1 We live here because we love it, not for the moneyAaron Douglas 2010-10-25 09:44:53
Everyone who lives in Oregon makes less money; someone in the same job in Seattle can earn twice as much as in Eugene, and the cost of living isn't "that" much higher in Seattle, it's just what people in Seattle expect for putting up with huge traffic jams, and the so-called "benefits" of being in a bigger city. Been there, done that. As a native Oregonian, I think we all know we don't live here for the money. We live here because we love it and the great outdoors we can so easily access. It's not like companies here are making more money, there's just less to go around for everyone. It's our "micro economy." We have more people living on less money.
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