Powerlist: Social media boosts ad firms

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Articles - October 2010
Monday, September 27, 2010

1010_Powerlist01Social media helps firms weather the downturn

Despite the recession, Oregon’s advertising industry has seen business pick up this year thanks in part to the prudent use of social media. “While signs are promising, cautious optimism still remains the operating mode for most businesses,” says Kent Hollenbrook, senior VP of Lake Oswego-based Waggener Edstrom. “Organizations have shifted from a blanket [old-school media] approach to a more grassroots approach,” says Anne Marie Levis of Eugene-based Funk/Levis & Associates about the increasing use of social media. Hollenbrook cautions against “Zombie media” — when a company launches a social media effort without strategy only to abandon it and let it aimlessly roam the digital world. Social media is a useful tool if well implemented.

PETER BELAND
RANKED BY NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES IN OREGON
RANK NAME / WEBSITE ADDRESS / PHONE SENIOR EXECUTIVE(S) OR EMP. / OR REV. NO. OFFICES / YEAR ESTAB.
1 Wieden+Kennedy
wk.com
224 N.W. 13th Ave.
Portland 97209 503.937.7000
Dan Wieden
420
ND
7
1982
2 Waggener Edstrom Worldwide
waggeneredstrom.com
Three Centerpointe Dr., Ste. 300
Lake Oswego 97035 503.443.7000
Pam Edstrom
Michael Bigelow
336
ND
16
1983
3 CMD
cmdagency.com
1631 N.W. Thurman St.
Portland 97209 503.223.6794
Phil Reilly
150
$35.4m
4
1978
4 R2C Group
R2CGroup.com
207 N.W. Park Ave.
Portland 97209 503.222.0025
Michelle Cardinal
Tim O’Leary
112
$21.4m
6
1998
5 VTM/Nereus
vtmgroup.com, nereus-worldwide.com
3855 S.W. 153rd Dr.
Beaverton 97006 503.619.0505
Rich Baek
Lori Zielinski
85
$11.9m
1
1995
6 HMH
thinkhmh.com
1800 S.W. First Ave., Ste. 250
Portland 97201 503.295.1922
Ed Herinckx
Paula Phillis
55
$4.5m
2
1978
7 eROI
eroi.com
505 N.W. Couch St., Ste. 300
Portland 97209 503.221.6200
Ryan Buchanan
Dylan Boyd
41
$4.7m
2
2002
8 Euro RSCG EDGE
eurorscgedge.com
915 S.W. Stark St., Second Floor
Portland 97205 503.228.5555
Mike Heiser
Brian Nakashima
40
ND
5
1988
8 Babcock & Jenkins
bnj.com
711 S.W. Alder St., Ste. 200
Portland 97205 503.382.8500
Denise Barnes
40
$7.3m
1
1992
10 The New Group
thenewgroup.com
4540 S.W. Kelly Ave.
Portland 97239 503.248.4505
Doug New
Steve Marshall
36
$4.4m
1
1993



 

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