Top 3 best small nonprofits

| Print |  Email
Articles - October 2010
Monday, September 27, 2010
1010_NonprofitSmall1
Dena Chilikos (left) and Susan Emmons, as the “aging muses” at Northwest Pilot Project, often don their fortune-telling costumes to predict co-workers’ futures.
1010_NonprofitSmall2
Leaves at Northwest Pilot commemorate clients who have passed away. // PHOTOS BY JUSTIN TUNIS

No. 3 Best Small Nonprofit

Northwest Pilot Project

In the office of Northwest Pilot Project, the smiling, wrinkled faces in the black-and-white photos hanging on the walls are a testament to the success of the Portland-based organization’s decades-long mission: to help low-income seniors find affordable housing and transportation to basic services.

“It’s tough; it’s largely an invisible population,” says deputy director Brenda Carpenter. “We try to be the conscience of the people.” Board members have often spent hours with the staff to learn how exactly the job is done and get to know the faces behind the frontline work.

 

1010_NonprofitSmall3
Northwest Pilot Project employee Cindy Mosney shows client Kristin Reinboth a housing assessment.
1010_NonprofitSmall4
Despite good-humored pranks and other general monkey business, the staff at Northwest Pilot take their work seriously. // PHOTOS BY JUSTIN TUNIS

The nonprofit provides housing services for about 1,500 people. After a senior is settled into a residence, it periodically follows up to make sure the placement is successful for everyone. Employees appreciate their close relationships with clients and love the feeling of success when they find a place to live for a senior in need.

“I was attracted to the integrity of the organization, its reputation,” housing specialist Caroline Smith says of her choice to join the organization, founded in 1969. This is Northwest Pilot’s second year as a 100 Best Nonprofit.

“We celebrate ‘summer serenity,’” housing specialist Jess Larson says, joking about the fake holiday created to fulfill the nonprofit’s policy of one day off a month. In addition to four weeks of paid vacation time, workers appreciate the 37.5-hour workweek and one-hour lunches. “We could find better salaries,” Larson says, “but never a better place to work.”

PETER BELAND


 

More Articles

Staffing Challenge

July/August 2015
Monday, July 13, 2015
BY KIM MOORE

A conversation with Greg Lambert, president of Mid Oregon Personnel Services.


Read more...

Downtime with Jill Nelson

September 2015
Wednesday, August 19, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Live, Work, Play wit the CEO of Ruby Receptionists.


Read more...

Inside the Box

September 2015
Wednesday, August 19, 2015
BY GINA BINOLE

Screening for “culture fit” has become an essential part of the hiring process. But do like-minded employees actually build strong companies — or merely breed consensus culture?


Read more...

Balancing Act

July/August 2015
Friday, July 10, 2015
BY DAN COOK

The Affordable Care Act has triggered a rush on health care plan redesign, a process fraught with hidden costs and consequences.


Read more...

The Private 150: From Strength to Strength

July/August 2015
Monday, July 13, 2015
BY KIM MOORE

Revenues in Oregon's private, for profit sector maintained solid growth as the economy continued to rebound.


Read more...

Greenpeace (temporarily) prevents Shell oil ship from leaving Portland

The Latest
Thursday, July 30, 2015
hangersBY JASON E. KAPLAN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Greenpeace activists suspended themselves from the St. John's Bridge in an attempt to prevent a ship from heading to the Arctic.


Read more...

Photo log: Murray's Pharmacy

The Latest
Friday, July 17, 2015
OBM-Heppner-Kaplan thumbBY JASON KAPLAN

Photographer Jason Kaplan takes a look at Murray's Pharmacy in Heppner.  The family owned business is run by John and Ann Murray, who were featured in our July/August cover story: 10 Innovators in Rural Health Care.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS