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Top 3 best large nonprofits

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Articles - October 2010
Monday, September 27, 2010
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Top 3 best large nonprofits
No. 2 Best Large Nonprofit
No. 3 Best Large Nonprofit
BY CORY MIMMS

Our second annual ranking of the 100 Best Nonprofits to Work For in Oregon celebrates what it means to be a great place to work.  Read about the top three large organizations, with more than 75 employees worldwide.

No. 1 Best Large Nonprofit

Susan G. Komen for the Cure

For the second year, the Oregon and SW Washington affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure has been ranked as the No. 1 Best Large Nonprofit to Work For in Oregon. The signs of their success point to the management style of executive director Christine McDonald. She uses the strengths of her 13 employees to build a team, says development manager Cristina Moore. Like puzzle pieces, the employees at Susan G. Komen fit together to form a life-saving team.

Donations to the organization, which works to find a cure for breast cancer, are up 89% since 2004, and employees are inspired to reach for more. Professional development opportunities are within their grasps; several of the employees at the Portland office began as administrative assistants and were promoted to other positions based on their interests. Health, vision, dental, and extra vacation time around the holidays are among the other perks that come with being a member of the Komen family.

The employees are dedicated to the mission of spreading breast cancer awareness and ensuring patients get the care they need. Recently, they gave up a weekend to move into a new office. “This is my social and professional life,” says communications coordinator Devon Downeysmith. The employees remember the people they serve on a daily basis. The hard work is “purpose driven,” says finance controller Sara McKean.

McDonald has forged her team in a fast-paced environment, and daily coffee runs supply the staff with enough energy to finish her  “organized sprint.” Yet she has managed to maintain a culture of openness and respect despite the frenzied pace.



 

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