Home Back Issues September 2010 Disaster business helps FLIR

Disaster business helps FLIR

| Print |  Email
Articles - September 2010
Friday, August 20, 2010
0910_ATS02
FLIR's cameras work by sensing wavelengths "beyond that of visible light" and display the temperature differences in black and white images. // PHOTO COURTESY OF FLIR

Recent disasters around the world have helped boost the fortunes of FLIR Systems, the Wilsonville-based manufacturer of thermal imaging cameras used in the private and government sectors.

Thermal imaging cameras manufactured by FLIR were in the hands of oil recovery workers at the BP oil spill in May. Thermal imaging allows the workers to see oil on the surface of the water during rough sea conditions.

In Iceland, FLIR’s cameras were used by geological researchers to view the eruption of a volcano.

“[Thermal imaging] brings a lot of new possibilities to analysis capability,” says Andy Teich, president of FLIR’s Commercial Systems Division, which generates more than $700 million of the company’s annual revenue of $1.2 billion.

FLIR’s Government Systems Division is also busy. In July, a $5.4 million order was placed by U.S. Customs and Border Protection. A similar order for $14.1 million was placed by STARA Technologies. These cameras will be used by U.S. Army personnel in Afghanistan. The cameras can see 15 to 20 km during the day or night, which is important for security operations of any type, Teich says. FLIR acquired ICx Technologies of Arlington, Va., for $274 million in late August.

FLIR’s purchase of Raymarine, a marine electronics company based in the United Kingdom, in May added $27.2 million in revenue, which accounted for more than half of the 19% increase between the second quarter of 2010 and the second quarter of 2009. The acquisition of Raymarine took their employee count to almost 2,000. FLIR’s new manufacturing and research facility located in Santa Barbara, Calif., will be operational in 2013. “We expect the company to grow 15% per year,” Teich says.

FLIR gets approximately 35% of its total revenue from government contracts. The rest is commercial sales, and the domestic and international market is almost equally split.

The need for infrared cameras has expanded past the military. Thermal imaging technology will probably take a path similar to GPS technology, Teich says. “Someday you will probably have a thermal camera in your cell phone.”

CORY MIMMS
 

More Articles

Interview: Dr. Mark Goulston

Contributed Blogs
Thursday, July 10, 2014
JustListenBY TOM COX | OB BLOGGER

Tom Cox interviews Dr. Mark Goulston, author of Just Listen, Discover the Secret to Getting Through to Absolutely Anyone.


Read more...

Oversight? Or gaming the system?

News
Monday, July 14, 2014
AmazonBY VIVIAN MCINERNY | OB BLOGGER

Some people think Amazon’s winking eye logo is starting to look like a hoodwink.


Read more...

Creating a culture of compliance

Business tips
Thursday, June 19, 2014
DataBY MONICA ENAND | GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

Nine tips for building habits among employees to respond when needed.


Read more...

Q&A: David Lively of Organically Grown Co.

News
Tuesday, July 01, 2014
OGCLogoBY HANNAH WALLACE | OB BLOGGER

Demand for organic food continues to soar: Last year, sales of organic food rose to $32.3 billion — up 10% from 2012. In Oregon, organic produce wholesaler Organically Grown Co. has been championing organic growing methods for four decades.


Read more...

The barber is back

June 2014
Thursday, May 29, 2014
BY MIKE GREEN

An old profession is new again.


Read more...

Updated: Disrupting innovation

News
Tuesday, July 08, 2014
070814 thumb disputive-innovationBY LINDA BAKER  | OB EDITOR

The New Yorker recently published a sharply worded critique of “disruptive innovation,” one of the most widely cited theories in the business world today. The article raises questions about the descriptive value of disruption and innovation  — whether the terms are mere buzzwords or actually explain today's extraordinarily complex and fast changing business environment. 

Update: We caught up with Portland's Thomas Thurston, who shared his data driven take on the disruption controversy.


Read more...

What I'm Reading

June 2014
Thursday, May 29, 2014

The CEO of Axiom EPM, Peri Pierone, and the co-founder of McMenamins, Mike McMenamin, share their recent reads.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS