Big salmon runs benefit tribes

| Print |  Email
Articles - August 2010
Thursday, July 22, 2010

 

0810_ATS05
Strong salmon returns in the Columbia River, including a huge comeback for a species nearly written off two decades ago, have given tribal fishermen an estimated $3.5 million economic boost over the past few months.

About 315,000 spring Chinook salmon migrated up the river this year, nearly doubling last year’s total, and tribal fishermen caught 42,000 of them. The fish average about 15 pounds each and sell for at least $5 per pound (much more for specialty markets), adding up to a catch worth at minimum $3.15 million.

Add to that total the surprising return of the Columbia River sockeye, all but given up for dead several decades ago. Sockeye have recovered powerfully as a result of good ocean conditions, more water spilling over dams to help young fish migrate downstream and habitat restoration in the tributaries of the Columbia River.

This year’s run of 375,000 Columbia River sockeye is by far the largest since the federal government built the fish-blocking Bonneville Dam in 1937. Tribal fishermen this year caught about 25,000 sockeye, selling them for prices of $5 per pound and up.

Sockeye are much smaller than Chinook, but even at an average of two-and-a-half pounds a fish, that’s another $312,500.

It adds up to a sizable boost for the 400 or so fishers from the four tribes with treaty fishing rights to the Columbia: the Yakama, the Nez Perce, the Warm Springs and the Umatilla. Mike Matylewich, a fish manager for the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, expects the full value of all of the 2010 tribal fisheries to approach $7 million. That’s a huge improvement from just seven years ago, when the fisheries combined for less than $1 million per year in sales.

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is also predicting better than average summer and fall Chinook runs on the Columbia.

BEN JACKLET
 

More Articles

Taking the lead in boosting Oregonians’ health and strengthening our economy

Contributed Blogs
Thursday, January 08, 2015
0108-injection-thumbBY CAMBIA HEALTH SOLUTIONS & OREGON BUSINESS COUNCIL | OP-ED

Businesses have a significant stake in the health of Oregonians. In fact, we cannot succeed without it. By committing to using our companies as levers for good health, we invest in our people, our business, our quality of life and our economy. 


Read more...

Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation.


Read more...

Convention Wisdom

February 2015
Monday, January 26, 2015
BY KIM MOORE

After more than a decade of wrangling, construction on a convention center hotel in Portland is slated to start this summer. But debate over project financing continues.


Read more...

Corner Office: Timothy Mitchell

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

A look-in on the life of Norris & Stevens' president, plus an abridged Powerlist for the best commercial real estate firms.


Read more...

The short list: Holiday habits of six Oregon CEOs

The Latest
Thursday, December 11, 2014
121214-xmaslist1BY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

We ask business and nonprofit leaders how they survive the season.


Read more...

That's Not a Watch (This Is a Watch)

February 2015
Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Smartwatches are all the rage. But old-fashioned timepieces keep on ticking.


Read more...

5 companies react to lower fuel prices

The Latest
Thursday, January 15, 2015
thumb-shutterstock 233787049BY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Consumers love the savings they get from low oil prices, but how has business been affected?


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS