July 2010

Staycations boost business at family entertainment centers

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Articles - July 2010
Friday, June 25, 2010

0710_ATS09Family entertainment centers around the state are booming as families continue to staycate this summer.

 

Low income housing goes sustainable

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Articles - July 2010
Friday, June 25, 2010

0710_ATS08The downturn has stalled many housing sectors, but one area that’s thriving thanks to local and federal funding is sustainable low-income housing projects.

 

Oregon Business wins awards

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Articles - July 2010
Friday, June 25, 2010

0710_ATS07Oregon Business has been awarded four first-place awards for excellence in business reporting and design by the Oregon chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. The awards were made in the nondaily category for work done in 2009.

 

Small airports struggle with economy

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Articles - July 2010
Friday, June 25, 2010

Oregon’s regional airports have held steady against the poor economy, adding new airlines, destinations and expansions despite some lower passenger counts.

 

Wave energy faces another delay

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Articles - July 2010
Friday, June 25, 2010

0710_ATS06Setbacks and drowned expectations, most notably the sinking of a test buoy off Newport in 2007, have stalled Oregon’s quest to be the leader in wave energy from the beginning. Now there’s another: The first energy buoy will not be installed off Reedsport in August as planned.

 

Dick Sass launches innovation fund

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Articles - July 2010
Friday, June 25, 2010

0710_ATS04Dick Sass, 67, recently partnered with medical devices expert Brian Brandell and longtime Portland investors Wayne Embree and Brock Metcalf to launch the Biomed Innovation Fund. His goal is to raise $20 million to help young companies that have developed “extraordinary technologies.”

 

Statewide ban on butterfly bush forces nurseries to adapt

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Articles - July 2010
Friday, June 25, 2010

0710_ATS03Butterfly bushes love the Oregon rain — a little too much. These popular purple plants have become the bullies of wet Oregon regions, pushing out indigenous species and landing themselves on the noxious weed list. In response, Oregon became the only state to ban Buddleja Davidii in January.

 
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Free Falling

Contributed Blogs
Thursday, December 18, 2014
121714-oilprice-thumbBY JASON NORRIS | OB CONTRIBUTOR

The implosion of the energy complex: The best thing for low oil prices is low oil prices.


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OB Poll: Wineries and groceries

News
Friday, October 24, 2014

24-winethumbA majority of respondents agreed: Local vineyards should remain Oregon-owned and quality is the most important factor when determining where to eat or buy groceries.


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The short list: 5 hot coffee shops for entrepreneurs

Contributed Blogs
Friday, November 14, 2014

CupojoeBY JESSICA RIDGWAY

Oregon entrepreneurs reveal their favorite caffeine hangouts.


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Tackling the CEO-worker pay gap

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014
BY OREGON BUSINESS STAFF

An SEC rule targets the disparity between executive and employee compensation, reigniting a long-standing debate about corporate social responsibility.


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Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


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Reimagining education to solve Oregon's student debt and underemployment problems

News
Thursday, November 13, 2014
carsonstudentdept-thumbBY RYAN CARSON | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

How do we skill up our future technology workforce in a smart way to take advantage of these high-paying jobs? The answer shouldn’t focus only on helping people get a bachelor’s degree.


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See How They Run

January-Powerbook 2015
Friday, December 12, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

Studying ground-running birds, a group that ranks among nature's speediest and most agile bipedal runners, to build a faster robot.


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