Low income housing goes sustainable

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Articles - July 2010
Friday, June 25, 2010
0710_ATS08
Juneberry Lane in Oregon City.
PHOTO COURTESY OF EARTH ADVANTAGE

The downturn has stalled many housing sectors, but one area that’s thriving thanks to local and federal funding is sustainable low-income housing projects.

Two green low-income projects in the state are taking the additional step of getting a community certificate from Earth Advantage, which requires community education and that each house have a low environmental impact.

Verde Village in Ashland, a 68-home green development, is stalled while 15 of its low-income units are moving forward. Eight of the 15 will be completed this fall with a loan from USDA Rural Development. As a prerequisite to the loan each household has to spend 32 hours a week helping to build their home.

The 12-home Juneberry Lane in Oregon City is a low-income sustainable housing project set for completion in early September. It’s funded by a variety of sources, with the majority coming from Clackamas County Community Development and a loan from Oregon City-based Lewis & Clark Bank.

“We can get the financing because it’s low-income housing,” says Sarah Buckley, executive director of Clackamas Community Land Trust. “For our buyers it’s their only option for owning a house. The lender feels a little better because of the buyer demand and the other funding.”

JOSEY BARTLETT
 

Comments   

 
Orion
0 #1 Rogue Valley CDCOrion 2010-07-08 12:17:48
Congrats to these two great affordable projects in towns that really need them. You omitted that Rogue Valley CDC is the name of the affordable housing developer that is working on Rice Park. More information here: http://www.verdevillage.net/rice_park.shtml, and here: www.roguevalleycdc.org.
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Laura Hayden
0 #2 parametersLaura Hayden 2010-08-07 14:39:09
could you explain how to get on the list for thi housing?
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Laura Hayden
0 #3 Laura Hayden 2010-08-07 14:40:49
can you tell me where to get more subsided housing including ths one describd?
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