Home Back Issues July 2010 Staycations boost business at family entertainment centers

Staycations boost business at family entertainment centers

| Print |  Email
Articles - July 2010
Friday, June 25, 2010

0710_ATS09Family entertainment centers around the state are booming as families continue to staycate this summer.

“A lot of people with the economy being tough right now are staying closer to home, but are tired of sitting around. This is why sales are up this year,” says Wynn Malikowski, personnel manager at Bend-based Sun Mountain Fun Center. Family centers offer sport lounges, high-tech virtual golf systems, Wii setups, bumper boats and classic games.

Big Al’s, based in Vancouver, Wash., is adding a second location in Beaverton this August. Wilsonville Family Fun Center is seeing a rise in sales. Sun Mountain Fun Center says their profits are up following a $2.5 million remodel two years ago, and  Portland’s Electric Castles Wunderland is looking to add a sixth location.

Suppliers are riding the coattails of entertainment center profits as well. Specialty Coin Products of Portland, a game retailer, says its profits are up 15% to 20% over last year. Salem-based J&J Amusements, a bumper car and bumper boat manufacturer, also reports sales are up to family centers.

“I have heard from top operators in high-end [family entertainment centers] that they have never made so much money before,” says Fred Groh, managing editor of International Bowling Industry. Over the past nine years, the state says wages for the Oregon amusement and arcade industry have increased by $600,000 and employment has grown by about 60 jobs, though no new centers have opened.

“This year is better than last,” says Keith Putnam, operations manager at Electric Castles Wunderland. “We have our eyes open for a place to expand.”

JOSEY BARTLETT
 

Comments   

 
Martha  Perez
0 #1 Staycation fueling boom in entertainment centersMartha Perez 2010-07-16 14:40:12
Where is the sixth location going to be for Electric Castles? I absolutely love the HQ site in the Belmont area. I also enjoy their venues, because they don't serve alcohol. How about a new store that caters to the over 21 crowd? Give BackSpace some healthy competition.
Quote | Report to administrator
 

More Articles

Why I became an Oregon angel investor

Guest Blog
Monday, July 14, 2014
AngelInvestBY TERRY "STARBUCKER" ST. MARIE

I really didn’t know that much about angel investing, but I did know a lot about the entrepreneurial spirit.


Read more...

Trends in business succession

News
Thursday, July 03, 2014
TrendsBY TED AUSTIN & MIKE BAELE | GUEST CONTRIBUTORS

The Office of Economic Analysis announced that Oregon is currently enjoying the strongest job growth since 2006. While this resurgence has been welcome, the lingering effects of the 2008 “Great Recession” continues to affect Oregon businesses, especially with regard to estate planning and business succession.


Read more...

Is this employee right?

Contributed Blogs
Wednesday, August 13, 2014
081314 thumb employeefeelingsBY TOM COX | OB BLOGGER

When I say, “Your Employee is Always Right,” I do not mean “right about the facts,” but rather “right about how they feel” and “right about how they want to be led.”


Read more...

Poll Wrap-Up

News
Friday, August 15, 2014

2014 NewPoll-report-newsletterthumbIn this week's poll, we asked readers: "Who should pay for the troubled Cover Oregon website?" Here are the results.


Read more...

Video: The 100 Best Survey

News
Thursday, August 28, 2014

100-best-logo-2015 500pxw-1OB Research Editor Kim Moore shares some pointers about the 100 Best Companies to Work For survey.


Read more...

Managing family assets: The importance of planning ahead

News
Friday, August 22, 2014
Unknown-1BY CLIFF HOCKLEY |  OB GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

When business intersects with family, a host of  situations can arise. Without a clear vision and careful planning, hard-earned investments can become stressful burdens.


Read more...

Updated: Disrupting innovation

News
Tuesday, July 08, 2014
070814 thumb disputive-innovationBY LINDA BAKER  | OB EDITOR

The New Yorker recently published a sharply worded critique of “disruptive innovation,” one of the most widely cited theories in the business world today. The article raises questions about the descriptive value of disruption and innovation  — whether the terms are mere buzzwords or actually explain today's extraordinarily complex and fast changing business environment. 

Update: We caught up with Portland's Thomas Thurston, who shared his data driven take on the disruption controversy.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS