The 2010 Top 150 Private Companies in Oregon

| Print |  Email
Articles - July 2010
Thursday, June 24, 2010

0710_150List02Given the beating that sales suffered at most U.S. companies during 2009, it’s no surprise our annual ranking of the state’s top private companies showed strains. Revenue fell an average of 5% but many companies reported dips exceeding 30%. This was a year when companies with 20% revenue declines could still find themselves rise in the rankings.

Last year, with the recession in full swing, five companies topped $1 billion in revenue. In this year’s list, Roseburg Forest Products, Hoffman Corp. and EPIC Aviation fell below that mark, leaving just two in the billion-dollar club: Jeld-Wen and Les Schwab.

North Pacific Group was another casualty from the top. The building products distributor, No. 6 last year, was no longer able to keep creditors at bay and went into receivership in May to liquidate assets. Other prominent companies on last year’s list — including ESCO Corp., Columbia Distributing and Platt Electric Supply — declined or did not respond to requests for their latest annual revenue. Given the choice of many private companies to keep a low profile, there may well be a billion-dollar business out there under our radar, but it’s still discouraging to see the top echelons of the list shrink.

On the encouraging side are the recent IPO announcements by Erickson Air-Crane (which did not respond to our survey) and Tripwire (No. 93), both of Portland. Look for them next year in our August 2011 Public Companies list.

Some retailers and wholesalers had a decent year. Western Family Foods, a Portland grocery distributor, saw an 11% jump in revenue, moving the company from 12 last year, to No. 6. Bi-Mart, Reser’s Fine Foods, Harry & David Holdings, C&K Market, Sherm’s Thunderbird Market and Plaid Pantries all advanced ranks with flat or modest sales declines.

Financial services powerhouse M Financial Group wasn’t so lucky. The Portland firm, which focuses on the ultra-affluent and Fortune 1000 companies, dropped from No. 7 to No. 10. In a dismal year for contracting and construction, Portland’s S.D. Deacon Corp. fell from No. 18 to No. 30. Yet Portland’s Harder Mechanical Contractors managed to grow sales 38%, leaping 20 ranks in the list to this year’s No. 18.

Wood products and building materials also were hit hard. Lumber Products of Tualatin, Swanson Group in Glendale, and Portland-based Tumac Lumber all stumbled in the rankings.

Last year, R2C Group was ranked No. 133 based on net revenue. This year, the Portland advertising agency correctly provided its gross revenue, moving it to No. 25 on the list. The company is thriving by targeting infomercials and other low-budget media on the secondary advertising market.

On average, this year’s Private 150 had $198.1 million in revenue. In total they had $29.7 billion. Just two years ago, these figures were $265.2 million and $39.8 billion. Now that the national economy is slowly growing again, perhaps next year’s numbers will be stronger. THE EDITORS



 

More Articles

Top stories in 2014

The Latest
Thursday, December 18, 2014
10-listthumb

2014 was a year of wild contradictions, fast-paced growth and unexpected revelations.


Read more...

Corner Office: Sheree Arntson

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

Checking in with the managing director of Arnerich Massena.


Read more...

Legislative Preview: A Shifting Balance

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014
BY APRIL STREETER

Democratic gains pave the way for a revival of environment and labor bills as revenue reform languishes.


Read more...

Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


Read more...

Old school: Paulsen's Pharmacy maintains old fashion ethos

The Latest
Thursday, December 18, 2014
121914-pharmacy-thumbBY MEGHAN NOLT

VIDEO: Under the radar — complete with a soda counter, the traditional Paulsen's Pharmacy looks to compete with big box retailers.


Read more...

The short list: Holiday habits of six Oregon CEOs

The Latest
Thursday, December 11, 2014
121214-xmaslist1BY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

We ask business and nonprofit leaders how they survive the season.


Read more...

The short list: 4 companies engaged in a battle of the paddles

The Latest
Thursday, December 04, 2014
pingpongthumbBY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Nothing says startup culture like a ping pong table in the office, lounge or lobby.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS