Romanian immigrants dominate adult foster care niche

Romanian immigrants dominate adult foster care niche

0710_Romanian02
0710_Romanian03
Felicia Barza, born and raised in Romania, in her Lake Oswego adult foster care home with resident Donald Dickey (top), and Marie Reitan (below) who is turning 101 in July. “This job is 24 hours a day, seven days a week ... It’s a good living, but I’m not going to be a millionaire,” says Barza.

Felicia Barza is sitting at a table in the Lake Oswego foster home she has operated since 2002.

“In Romania, you take care of your mother, your grandmother, your great-grandmother,” the 62-year-old says. “My great- grandmother died in my arms when I was 7. I was so proud.”

The former director of an auto parts warehouse in Transylvania, Barza landed in Anaheim in 1993, where her daughter had emigrated a few years earlier. “Then somebody told me about foster homes in Portland,” she recalls. “I thought the best thing was to be a caregiver because then I [spoke no] English.”

Adult foster care is a relatively small and unknown entity in the long-term adult care industry. There are few statistics indicating the size and demographics of the Oregon market. In 2008, foster homes served about 4,000 of the state’s 27,000 long-term-care Medicaid clients, a sector valued at about $1.1 billion. Another 5,000 foster-care residents pay out of pocket, and many homes serve both Medicaid and private-pay clients.

Unlike nursing homes, adult family dwellings are real houses in residential neighborhoods, often modified with additional rooms, baths and safety features. Although most foster-care providers are not medical professionals, each home is assigned a nurse who delegates tasks such as dispensing medication. In Oregon, the state regulates the industry, with the exception of Multnomah County, where the county wields jurisdiction. Regulators issue licenses to foster-care operators based on the level of care they have the training and experience to provide.

At her establishment, Felicia’s Adult Care Home, Barza attends to five seniors who need help in almost all aspects of daily living: eating, toileting, bathing and behavior management. With the help of a live-in assistant — a Romanian man who grew up in a Transylvanian monastery — Barza also cleans house, does laundry and cooks three meals daily, including native specialties such as chicken paprikash.

Then there is the constant stream of people — case managers, social workers and family members — going in and out her door.

“This job is 24 hours a day, seven days a week,” says Barza. “It’s a good living, but I’m not going to be a millionaire.”

In an era of skyrocketing health care costs, relative affordability is one of the foster-care industry’s key selling points. Nursing homes cost about $7,500 a month; foster care, by contrast, runs about $3,500 to $5,000. Medicaid reimbursement rates reflect a similar divide. The state pays about $6,500 per month for nursing home care and $1,800 for foster care. The cost differential is a source of aggravation for foster-care operators, who believe Medicaid compensation for their services should be higher. But the lower reimbursement rates also mean Oregon saves hundred of millions of dollars by placing Medicaid clients in foster homes instead of nursing facilities.

This year, there are 2,755 Medicaid residents in adult foster care. That saves the state about $158 million, according to an analysis by the Oregon Department of Aging and Disability Services.

But the inherent challenges of caring for the elderly day and night can also lead to complications and complaints. In 2009, there were 700 complaints registered against adult foster homes, including rule violations and allegations of abuse; 27% of those allegations were substantiated. In nursing home and assisted- living facilities, by comparison, about 33% of the total allegations were substantiated.

To understand how Romanians came to dominate the public and private foster-care markets, start with the community’s unique set of assets. The first-generation Romanian refugees who immigrated to Portland seeking religious freedom were well educated, with doctors, engineers and business people among the ranks. Their language is also of Latin origin; unlike Laotian and Ethiopian refugees, Romanians didn’t have to learn a new alphabet.

 

0710_Romanian04
Lidia Pap, with daughter Ellise Pap, age 4, in the family’s adult foster care home in Wilsonville. Pap is a second-generation care provider whose facility is on a blueberry farm.

Other transferable skills have helped the Romanians succeed. Raised in a communist country noted for its economic and political hardships, the Romanian émigrés share a history of depending on family and friends. Those shared values have translated into a useful strategy for building a family-based, community care industry.

Fashionable in black boots and jeans, 36-year-old Lidia Pap is a good example of the Romanian foster-care network as well as second-generation provider trends. She learned the business growing up in her parents’ adult foster home and now owns her own residence, Just Like Home, on a blueberry farm in Wilsonville, one of a growing number of luxury foster homes springing up in the suburbs.

 



Comments   

 
margaret bubb
+16 #1 RE: Romanian immigrants dominate adult foster care nichemargaret bubb 2011-09-23 23:50:33
i think that it is great that you are taking care of the elderly, because in this country they put them in nursing home and forget about them, so if you are making money while you are caring for them i say more power to you i am looking to start my own elder care in my home, so if you could give me some advice i would gladly appreciate it.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Anna
-31 #2 Oregonians -- take back our foster care homes!!!Anna 2011-10-11 10:14:24
This is not good. Americans need to get back to caring for their own elderly! I have seen many bad things happen at these Romanian foster care homes. Yes, they are big and glitzy and pricy houses...but very sadly lacking in love at the ones I saw. A glitzy side for the public to see - but go behind the scenes and you may find something entirely different. Oregonians, wake up! You do NOT want to end up in a Romanian foster care home!!!
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
caregiver
+18 #3 For Annacaregiver 2012-01-25 00:47:20
Sorry to hear about your bad experience with the adult foster care homes but maybe you've been looking at the wrong homes. I worked in a foster care home and i visited many nursing homes and if i had to choose i would absolutely go to a foster care home. As for who goes where and who owns the home it's one's private matter... If you didnt like it, dont go there...
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Scott Kemp
+17 #4 I own a free service that helps seniors find the best housing option for them and I've been very impressed with the Romanian care homesScott Kemp 2012-02-15 00:31:58
I'm originally from San Jose where all of the Adult Foster Homes are owned by the Filipino population and they do an equally wonderful of taking care of seniors. By the way, I personally choose to call these homes Residential Care Homes because of the negative, degrading and inaccurate term "Adult Foster Home." I've definitely noticed the Romanian caregivers do a great job "technically", but I can say that in making a huge generalization some lack the warmth and sensitivity that the Philipino caregivers provide while administering care.

I'm pretty sure America is at the top of the list for our spot-on reputation of being one of the world's worst perpetrators when it comes to taking care of our elderly. We seem to discard them or be quick to put them in a nursing or residential home before as family units trying to figure out a way to let them stay in our own homes. I never understood why families don't come together and pool their money and figure out a way to keep mom or dad in one of the children's homes. It very sad.

I've worked as an Occupational Therapist with seniors from 2001 to 2009, and now own a company that provides a free service for families where I help them locate the most appropriate senior housing option for their mom or dad . With more than 1,000 care homes in Portland-Metro I wish more families new about free agencies like mine. MY agency is called Senior Housing Locaters and can be found by clicking this link here .

Great article, and I'm very grateful for the Romanian and Eastern European population in the Northwest because they make my job so much easier by finding my clients wonderful care homes, faster!
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
David Rich
+14 #5 Adult Foster CareDavid Rich 2012-02-15 15:52:55
My father lived with us for the last 12 years of his life but for the last six months it became clear that we could no longer provide the care that he needed on a 24X7 basis. We had intended to put him in a senior care facility but his doctor said he needed more care than they could provide so the choice became a nursing home which we were not thilled about until someone mentioned adult foster care homes, which we had never heard about. We found a great home in Beaverton ran by a great family and they took wonderful care of my father until he passed away in their home. I have a Romanian employee who has modified his residence in Vancouver as a adult foster care home as well.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Dolly
-20 #6 Is the level of care appropriate at an AFH?Dolly 2012-02-24 20:52:48
The previous poster stared that his father was deemed not appropriate for a senior care facility since he required 24/7 nursing care. An Adult Foster Home doesnot provide 24/7 nursing supervision, or even 12 hours per day nursing supervision. From my experience, a nurse "stops in" every now and then. The "care" is typically provided by the AFH owner and a CNA, at best. An AFH should not be allowed to take in residents who require nursing supervision during the waking hours, yet many of them do. The question is whether the $4,000 - $5,000 spent monthly at an AFH would be better spent at a licensed assisted living facility where your loved one can have the privacy of his or her own bathroom and receive the benefit of nursing supervision from 8:00 am - 8:00 pm. An important component of maintaining one's dignity is not sharing a bathroom. No matter how spotless or homey an AFH might be, the fact that your loved one shares a bathroom makes AFHs undesirable, in my opinion. If the cost were half of what a licensed assisted living facility charges, I could see where an AFH makes sense, but at $4,000 - $5,000 monthly, you will get a much higher level of care at an assisted living facility and more privacy although the assisted living facilities have a greater number of residents.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Cosmin
+19 #7 this is more for :+1 #2 Oregonians -- take back our foster care homes!!! — AnnaCosmin 2012-05-19 22:49:07
Yes if you want to know I’m Romanian But just stop and think just a little beat, how good is a nursing home????????Let just take a small example in that nursing home you have 100 elderly and 20 employers Do you think they get more attention than an adult family home???????
In adult family home you have up to 6 elder (in Washington state) and 24/7, 2 employers And the elder feel like they are grandmother or grandfather inside that house
About that???????
Do you think they feel the same in nursing home?
In adult family home they can choices every day what to eat
About nursing home?
And the list can go on and on these are just very fast few examples
And, about Romanian???????
Yes they are more smart then others
They come here in us with nothing and in 2-3 years they have more than an average person around here is getting in more than 10 years
Just drive around your city or go 10-20 blocks around your house and just look how many good houses is immigrants and others???????
And you will see most of the people they take too much for grana Romanian not
Romanian they work very hard to make sure they have everything what they need and to make sure they leave something for kids
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Cogn
-35 #8 Taking Oregon jobs!Cogn 2012-05-20 17:46:18
Oregonians, take back your jobs. I second that comment.

See the comment above:

"Yes if you want to know I'm Romania.
And, about Romanian???????
Yes they are more smart then others"

These people come to the USA, take jobs from Americans and make comments like this. This situation is unacceptable. How does this happen?

These homes are in the middle of regular residential neighborhoods but they have many times the average number of people living in them. They have excessive traffic and take up parking spaces from regular home owners.

This is unacceptable.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Flappy
+18 #9 Interesting article and responsesFlappy 2012-05-22 07:50:17
As an AFC provider who has "worked their way up" to ownership of one of 8 providers licensed to provide our level of care in the State I feel my Wife and I are probably qualified to weigh in here. She and I started in AFC in '94 coming from baccalaureate level mental health positions which paid next to nothing.
In recompense we received such luxuries as shouts from State workers by way of insults when we turned in our vouchers for payment when they were on strike, no income taxes withheld and long hours spent questioning whether the contribution we were making was worth all the sacrifice. I can safely say now with hindsight that it was.
One of the themes in the article seemed to be about how "homelike" the atmosphere was. In fact that is defined and explained in the Oregon Adminitrative Rules. The problem is in how we define homelike and who interprets it. I myself being raised in suburban Multnomah/Clack amas County for my first 20 years might have an entirely different opinion of what "homelike" is from yours or your providers. Another issue mentioned was finance. It goes without saying that the Medicaid rates are atrocious at best and in fact a good many smaller/newer homes could not make ends meet during the current "bust" of Federal funding and ended up closing due to unfavorable economic conditions not substandard care.
Which leads me to address the substantiated complaints. I agree that 27% is way too high, even with it being 6% better than Nursing Homes. However in my experience having had a few unfoundeds thrown at us for good measure, we do NOT see the institutional-c ausal errors that you see with the poorer staffing ratios, systemized response and overall general overwork that contributes to neglect/abuse as defined by OAR and the most of us in general, consumer or provider. Better funding/trainin g for providers and licensing staff would be a great help in addition to a non-adversarial approach which would help make the inspection process a lot more transparent to all concerned and would lessen the violations and substantiations .
And now to speak to the specific posts in regards to this article.
1. My Family came down the Columbia on a covered wagon loaded onto a Barge. We are proud 3rd generation native Oregonians and I do not wish to subscribe to the fallacy of immigrants taking our jobs as the same things have been said for far too long. If you want it bad enough you will pour your very soul into it and will be rewarded by your efforts. Nothing else to be said except get off your duff and make it happen instead of grousing why it isn't delivered with the mail.
2. As far as impact on local Neighborhoods.. .damned sorry but everyone voted in the Americans with Disabilities Act and equal access to Housing was one of the guarantees. As far as I know density of occupation according to local laws was NOT amended or superseded so the idea of "tons" of extra occupancy per house is nonsense. The extra vehicles and traffic would be necessary in any home setting for dependent folks, are you suggesting stacking them like cordwood would be better?
3. Ever since my Wife and I have been providing we have taken less than one of our full-time employees in any given Month. Lose a Resident? Too bad. You are still responsible to provide your employees not only with a living wage, but to do the best in their behalf much the same as you do for a Resident. Resident goes to Hospital for routine procedure? Good deal except for you aren't paid for while they're away and still need to make Payroll.
As I said, interesting topic and responses. Everyone WILL be affected by the choices we make now and I think it behooves us a nation to think about the consequences of our actions and how we vote with our money and politics.
It's food for thought........ ..
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Portlandval
+10 #10 Astounded by lack of national policyPortlandval 2012-05-24 00:00:58
This article is interesting and personally timely for me as I am considering how to handle my Father's recent diagnosis with early dementia. My sister and I are currently sharing our homes with him while he still has moderate levels of independence. I have been blown away by the lack of national policy for the care of our elderly. It is mind boggling what is going to happen when all the baby boomers need care. Everyone is living longer but not necessarily with independence. My sister and I cannot place him in assisted living because he is too forgetful for that service and needs more help than is provided there, he is too healthy for nursing care so we are lucky right now to be able to help him in our families. We want to keep him in a private home as long as possible but it is good to know that foster homes or nursing homes are next phase options.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
+16 #11 A provider myselfGuest 2012-06-25 23:34:15
I am a little late to the party on this but as a provider myself, there are a few points that are missing. I am native Oregonian and operate 2 AFH's out of the PDX area. We have specialized homes with additional staff at each and have 9 employees. For those that suggest we keep jobs for Oregonians, I would almost like you to attend an interview when searching for a new employee. Most people we interview are disgusted that they have to assist with showers, feeding, and even wiping a behind or 2. Many people just don't want to work.

In regards to national standards and state rules, Oregon was one of the first to implement rules to oversee AFH's. Other states follow a basic standard but a national level would take away the local authority to resolve problems.

As the article states, the Romanians understand the value of taking care of family. Us Americans are many times only interested in what mom/dad, grandma/grandpa are leaving them in the form of an inheritance.

It is not a glamorous business and operates 24/7/365. Even with employees, we have not taken a vacation in several years. I am not complaining, I chose to do this. The rewards are not always monetary and has plenty of satisfaction.

If you are looking for placement of your loved one, shop around. As with any business, there are good and bad apples. Not every home is the same and sometimes if you like a home, it may not be the best fit for others that live there.

Also in comment to state payments.... They are much too low. In my area, $3800 / month is what is expected for level 3 residents. The state pays about $2200 for that same resident. The costs for the provider are the same: payroll, mortgage, utilities, etc. If you are looking to place someone whose bill is being paid by the state and are told there are no openings, now you know why.

Thanks for allowing me to clarify a few things!!
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
+10 #12 Advisor for a placement agencyGuest 2012-07-11 20:01:11
I've been in the industry now for several months. now Most of the RCFE purveyors I meet are Romanians. I have never a more caring, clean,safety conscious loving peoples.
Some mention neighbors who complain about having multiple tenants in the neighborhood. I suppose a family with 6 kids running around outside would be preferable? I think not.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
+17 #13 former client lee f. evans, jr.Guest 2012-08-20 05:25:19
for a short period of time i had to stay in loridana tosa's home on 14th drive in gresham, due to a health problem i had. i do not recall a single time i had any negative times with her. in fact, she, her mother, husband, and children all made me, a black man, feel at home... i'm thinking about returning to portland, and with my health being as it is/parkinson's disease, and i hope loridana has an apartment open, or a nice room, i want to try to get it, i am in kentucky, and when i read the thing, full of lies about the romanians'nursi ng- home, and treatment, i have to react, due to my been in more than one home, either as a resident or visitor, when my late wife was a resident in them... i like these hardworking people, and wish all of them the best of success, and would love to hear from loridana, anytime. she and any of the others may contact me by e-mail... lee f. evans, jr... thank you lori and john, do you still have the goats and calves?
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
0 #14 recommendationsGuest 2012-08-24 17:55:56
Does anyone have any great recommendations for Residential Care Homes in Portland, OR? Thanks.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
-7 #15 Wiser NowGuest 2012-09-03 16:16:00
I will speak from experience with romanian foster care both personally and professionally.

In the vast majority of homes it is a lie to say the care is 24 hrs/day. At best, it is probably about 12 hours so take that into account when comparing prices. People who are not independent with ambulation are usually put to bed right after an early supper and are left unattended and confined to their bed, as the caregivers go 'off duty' for the evening to have family time. Frequently the family quarters are far removed from the residents making it hard to hear calls for help. Residents are frequently left alone for 12 hours or more. This means that people who could go to the bathroom if they had help are forced to be incontinent instead and are placed in diapers and left in them for 12 hours or more, even if wet or dirty. This can lead to falls as residents try to get out of bed alone. It can also contribute to skin and circulation problems and insomnia and anxiety from lying confined and feeling helpless for so many hours.

The vast majority of these homes have no employees, it is just a husband/wife and their kids and they do work hard. But they have to have some family time and sleep, so that means that unless a resident is having an emergency (bm's are NOT emergencies), they are left alone at night. They can be very harsh to residents who disturb them at night 'unneccesarily' . This also can mean limited visiting opportunities in the eve. for family who work and can't get there during the day.

There are numerous other issues, such as lack of formal skills, communication problems and cultural differences I won't go into here.

These homes can be a good fit for people who need help with activities of daily living but still have a measure of independence and can walk about on their own and tend to their own needs at night. I don't recommend them for people who are not ambulatory on their own due to the night time confinement and abandonment, unless the home has someone who is paid to be up at night as often as needed - but you will pay a very high price for that. I recommend residential care facilities (a state designation) instead - up to 60 residents - as these facilities will have 24 hr. awake care givers and provide more help and supervision than assisted-living .
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
0 #16 RE: Romanian immigrants dominate adult foster care nicheGuest 2012-09-26 02:17:48
Quoting Guest:
Does anyone have any great recommendations for Residential Care Homes in Portland, OR? Thanks.

go to whipple creek senior estates in vancouver washington
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
+6 #17 Nurse/caregiver doing AFC for 35 yrs.Guest 2012-10-29 21:31:17
I live in the midwest and have had many people stay with me over these 35 yrs. They say your family is who you make it, and most of the people I've cared for have become "family". I care for 2-3 people at any one time. When someone passes away, I may wait a year or more to find someone else to put in their room. I have to wait until I'm ready. I realize I'm lucky to be able to do this. Now a word about fees. The only time I will accept Medicaid is if someone who has been staying with me a long time runs out of funds. At that point, I'm not about to make them leave. The medicaid rate here is between $850 and $1000. The last time someone went on medicaid, she paid 10.88 per day for room, 10.88 per day for food out of her Social Security. Medicaid won't pay for room and board. Medicaid paid me $340.00 for 730 hrs. of work. That's under $0.47 per hr. and I got the highest rate! The last time I worked for 47 cents I was 12 and babysat. (this was almost 50 yrs ago) Medicaid rates need to be adjusted up-way up.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
-13 #18 Romanian "Care" HomesGuest 2012-11-22 04:06:38
Please avoid these "care" homes. Violations are terribly common, from small infractions to the most serious. Three elderly people have died after being fed poisonous mushrooms. Please demand better for yourself and your loved ones.

http://www.pressdemocrat.com/article/20121121/WIRE/121129917/1010/sports?Title=3rd-death-at-Northern-California-nursing-home-from-mushroom-poisoning-
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
-8 #19 HkrrerGuest 2012-11-27 02:58:06
Quoting Cogn:
Oregonians, take back your jobs. I second that comment.

See the comment above:

"Yes if you want to know I'm Romania.
And, about Romanian???????
Yes they are more smart then others"

These people come to the USA, take jobs from Americans and make comments like this. This situation is unacceptable. How does this happen?

These homes are in the middle of regular residential neighborhoods but they have many times the average number of people living in them. They have excessive traffic and take up parking spaces from regular home owners.

This is unacceptable.




mot any jobs you'd want. That line is worthless.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
+9 #20 GuestGuest 2012-12-27 22:05:05
You people are absolutely KILL'N me on these POSTS! Quit slamming other people and other cultures for cryin out loud. Im an American and fortunately I plan on opening a top notch Adult Family home facility. I have to admit- As Americans we are AWEFUL at taking care of our elderly- it actually makes me sick. But thats why Im doing MY PART. At least Be GLAD there are people willing to do the job! And Im not sure the last time you people looked at "America", but Im pretty sure its made up of every single race and religion you can think of. We want to look better as a COUNTRY, then everyone needs to play a role- EVERYONE- all religions, all races. Quit blaming others and step up and do YOUR PART! UGGG- grow up people.... Good Grief~
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
+5 #21 LalaGuest 2013-01-12 23:33:19
It seems to me that there are lots of people with hate towards the Romanians and their buss ....reading the comments I can tell they don' t even know the diff between nursing care and adult care home. So as an advice inform yourselves before critising.
I am also wondering where all these full hate comments are gone take us.... For sure are not gone make us any better than the ones we spoke about......I wish for those that spoke bad that they will never end up looking for care for their loved ones................
Have a nice day!
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
+8 #22 EMGuest 2013-01-20 20:48:07
My Father suffered a stroke, the Hospital keeps these victims for approx 3 weeks then ships them off to a Rehab/nursing home, where they are giving therapy and kept in their beds most of the time. When your medicare runs out on that service, you are forced to find other places or pay the rehab center over $8500 a month. We started looking at Adult Homes and there are all sorts of levels and prices. Fortunately, there are coordinators who will take you to these places. After a month at the home we chose, our family could not be happier. But it is up to YOU the family, to find the best situation for your relative. Also you need to still interact with your relative as much as possible, and make them feel not only at home with the Adult caregivers but with your love. The Romanians are hard workers, and that is what the USA is suppose to be made up of, not people who wont work or have their hands out wanting for nothing. I agree private bathrooms are a must.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
0 #23 HeyGuest 2013-01-21 14:02:05
Hi, Im from the UK, i am very interested in your views of these Adult Foster Homes as this is not popular here, but i think its a great idea! We have nursing homes and home care (carers visit those in their own homes who usually require minimal help.).
Id like to know which is more preferrable, Nursing Homes or Adult Foster Homes, and why? x Thank you x x x
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
+3 #24 AFHGuest 2013-01-25 17:04:05
I think it all depends on the home. You should get some references before choosing one. I've lived in an AFH and things where so and so . Great caregiver, cheap owner so...you get the picture...

And about this :
Quoting Cogn:
Oregonians, take back your jobs. I second that comment.

See the comment above:

"Yes if you want to know I'm Romania.
And, about Romanian???????
Yes they are more smart then others"

These people come to the USA, take jobs from Americans and make comments like this. This situation is unacceptable. How does this happen?

These homes are in the middle of regular residential neighborhoods but they have many times the average number of people living in them. They have excessive traffic and take up parking spaces from regular home owners.

This is unacceptable.

Quoting Cogn:
Oregonians, take back your jobs. I second that comment.

See the comment above:

"Yes if you want to know I'm Romania.
And, about Romanian???????
Yes they are more smart then others"

These people come to the USA, take jobs from Americans and make comments like this. This situation is unacceptable. How does this happen?

These homes are in the middle of regular residential neighborhoods but they have many times the average number of people living in them. They have excessive traffic and take up parking spaces from regular home owners.

This is unacceptable.


At least we know a second( or even a third language) and it's more that I can say about you guys. All the smart " americans" I've met since I moved here were Canadians, Mexicans, Koreans.
I wanna see you go and start over in an non-English speaking country. You'll starve with money in your pockets!
And... Nobody takes jobs from you, that's why we open this facilities, we create jobs for ourselves and your kind too.
Best regards!
A feisty Romanian!
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
+3 #25 foster homesGuest 2013-01-29 22:06:51
somebody has to do the dirty work, they do a really good job, we had our grendpa in one of this romanian beautifull homes and they took really good care of him.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
0 #26 placement servicesGuest 2013-02-13 16:56:49
Sir,
My name is Vic and I would like to start an ELDERLY PLACEMENT
SERVICE as yours .
Is there a path to follow to do that, specific requirements or a website I need to go so to be informed??
Sir,any help would be very appreciated!!

Thank you very much!!
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
+8 #27 Passionate Caregiver/Provi derGuest 2013-03-13 05:25:16
Wow... It took me a while to read through all these comments...
*** I'm sorry for those people that are "hating on Romanians" and think that adult care homes are not good.

I am a second generation Romanian caregiver... my parents owned and operated an adult care home that I grew up in for over 15 years before I got married and opened my own home -- as a kid growing up in a home -- you either hate it or love it! I'm one who LOVES this kind of work... I'm VERY PASSIONATE about taking care of elderly the best that I can on a daily basis 24/7!!! and YES!!! IT IS 24/7!!! We are CONSTANTLY available ready to tend to every need! I've spent the night in the hospital with one of my residents because the family was not available to be with her... As a provider/caregi ver I go above and beyond what a normal care facility does for their residents.

I have 7 brothers and sisters and we all own adult care homes in the Portland-Metro area! We have an "on-call" RN available anytime AND we work with House Call Providers which is an amazing service of doctors and nurse practitioners that visit the residents right in our homes!!!

The residents truly become a part of our family! Home cooked meals, individualized activities, shopping trips, ext... MOST OF THE TIME... WE ARE THEIR ONLY FAMILY... because sadly some families barely visit :-(

It is VERY insulting when I read some of these negative comments putting down Romanian adult care homes. I'm sure there are some "bad apples" out there, like in every business... but overall these homes are an AWESOME ALTERNATIVE TO INSTITUTIONALIZ ED CARE!!!

I also work with 5 other providers and we help families find APPROPRIATE senior housing throughout the Portland Metro area... BASED ON THEIR CARE NEEDS and preferences NOT BASED ON THEIR ABILITIES TO PAY! There are LOTS of types of care facilities -- there's no way a regular person would know all the levels without having the experience -- Assisted Livings, Residential Care, Nursing Homes, Independent Living, In-HOME care-giving services, ADULT CARE HOMES... ext... ext... We do a full assessment of the resident and together with the family we determine what the most appropriate care setting would be for their loved ones current and future needs. How can we run adult care homes AND do placements you may ask?! Because WE ARE ACTUAL LICENSED CAREGIVERS -- Some of these "agencies" just pop out of no where with no background in health care or care giving, no one to monitor them or to license them -- no idea of the complexity of doing a full assessment in order to make a successful placement. DO YOUR HOMEWORK!! Again... there are some "bad apples" amongst agencies unfortunately.. . Overall I've had great experiences with the local ones that I've worked with -- the thing is... the services are free to the family -- but within the last few years MOST placement agencies has RAISED THEIR PLACEMENT FEES to adult care homes to 100% of the first month!!

You want great examples of adult care homes on a visual basis? Here you go!!! ENJOY!!!... YES.. WE ARE ROMANIAN!

www.wvsenior.com
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
+8 #28 Stuart M.Guest 2013-04-06 06:19:15
I was born in Oklahoma to parents of German descent. At the age of 40 I made my first trip to Romania. That was only maybe 9 years after communism fell. I met Romanians from all walks of life: farmers, school teachers, doctors, business owners, etc. They were invariably very poor by European standards (thanks to communism), however, I never met a more friendly, kind and generous people in any of my travels throughout the world (okay, the police were nothing to write home about). I was invited by farmers to eat their home-made cheese and drink their home-made wine, I was given sight-seeing tours in cities by total strangers, a truck driver invited me to spend the weekend at his mountain vacation home. I had a great time. Another thing, and some Romanians might be annoyed when I say this because they're not the same thing, but even the Romanian Roma (gypsies) I met were friendly and hardworking. I didn't just get lucky. I went there about 15 times (I lost count), I loved Romania and the Romanians so much. I haven't been there since 2003, and I miss it. What does this have to do with this article? I'm sure there are good adult foster care homes and bad ones. But I would not hesitate to live in one run by Romanians. Noroc!
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
+7 #29 Excellent Care in Adult Foster CareGuest 2013-04-10 16:19:24
My mother fell while living alone in her lovely retirement apartment. I am her only relative and was out of town at the time. Not wanting to "bother" anyone, my mom stayed alone for several days, until I came back to Portland and stopped in to visit. After rushing her to the doctor, and finding that she had fractured her spine due to undiagnosed osteoporosis, I tried to care for her in her apartment, and sustained two serious injuries to myself, and also paid over $40,000.00 to an in home care agency who I employed to give me respite time. I ultimately had to take early retirement from a job that I loved.......... ....but thankfully, our financial advisor suggested I explore the adult foster care system. I spent a couple of months visiting and interviewing over 60 of these homes in the Portland area and finally, and thankfully, found one that 1) had two entire families spread over two homes next door to each other, all family members doing care so there is always more than one person on duty 2) is convenient to my home as I had to visit multiple times a day for the first few months and now, after five years, have settled into a routine of a few times a week and 3) had an opening. The family helped me physically move my mom and the furnishings she could take with her. The food is delicious. The outlook from Mother's room is pleasant and she can watch the birds and squirrels and neighborhood walkers out her window. Housecall Providers (an invaluable service) comes monthly to check Mother as taking her to an appointment requires hiring Metro West transport as she cannot transfer into and out of my car on her own and I cannot lift her (got a hernia and had to have surgery for that trying to care for her on my own)........... ........plus a care family member would take her to appointments if necessary when I'm out of town. It is expensive...... ........but well worth every penny. I have no siblings and have a small apartment that is only mine, and not set up for even an overnight guest, much less someone requiring care 24/7. Mother's caregivers are Romanian and are thoughtful, caring, careful, competent and the next best thing to family that both she and I have, regarding her physical care. Mother is now 94 years old and in reasonable physical health except for the spinal fracture (she cannot walk) - dementia is slowly taking her mind but we can still visit when I go. Adult foster care is the only solution for our situation and we are most grateful that it exists in Oregon.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
+2 #30 Korean Foster CareGuest 2013-06-24 03:26:10
Does anyone know of a korean Foster care place in Portland that take medicaid/medica re? My mom lives out of town and I am trying to bring her to Portland to have her close by.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
+2 #31 Korean Foster Care?Guest 2013-06-24 17:52:49
If you would like, you can call me at 503-723-1444 and I can help you find a Korean Foster Care for your mom. I can send out announcements to the providers in the Portland Metro area and find out if anyone owns or has an adult care home with a Korean speaking caregiver.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
+5 #32 Adult Foster CareGuest 2013-07-18 00:49:33
After a tragic accident, my mom went from the hospital, to a rehab facility/SNF, to intermediate care, to adult foster care, and after I couldn't take what I was seeing in the AFC, into my home for several years until she died. That AFC came recommended - you could eat off their floors, but don't expect empathy for the patient's situation. Basically it was a warehouse. I rescued Mom and became an AFC provider myself until she died, so I know quite personally what is involved in that care.

Now my mother-in-law is in a 'Romanian AFC' and it has restored my faith in humanity. With one small exception, based on a new immigrant with language issues, the owner and staff are fantastic people....the right values, patient and caring and good problem solvers. Do I object if they have a lovely home because they've figured out what their skills are and intend to prosper here? I admire them.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
0 #33 RECAPGuest 2014-01-13 17:49:33
My Father has passed away. But, not until we went through more than one ACH, and reviewed dozens of them.
MAKE SURE YOU REALLY STAY IN TOUCH WITH YOUR FAMILY IN A ACH!
When my father asked to be sent to emergency, the caregiver brought him a glass of water! Fortunately his old friend arrived and called the EMT's right away.
Next place we placed both my folks into, and that was a nightmare. $9000 a month, and they would not serve butter, napkins were torn in half, pilfering and the list goes on. Spotless, yes. Cold, they are all so cold, saving on heat. They also said they lived in the home, and didn't. The owners were never there, just two women who knew no english.


Quoting Guest:
My Father suffered a stroke, the Hospital keeps these victims for approx 3 weeks then ships them off to a Rehab/nursing home, where they are giving therapy and kept in their beds most of the time. When your medicare runs out on that service, you are forced to find other places or pay the rehab center over $8500 a month. We started looking at Adult Homes and there are all sorts of levels and prices. Fortunately, there are coordinators who will take you to these places. After a month at the home we chose, our family could not be happier. But it is up to YOU the family, to find the best situation for your relative. Also you need to still interact with your relative as much as possible, and make them feel not only at home with the Adult caregivers but with your love. The Romanians are hard workers, and that is what the USA is suppose to be made up of, not people who wont work or have their hands out wanting for nothing. I agree private bathrooms are a must.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
+1 #34 Great Care!Guest 2014-01-13 19:54:26
As a family member, it is your responsibility to check on your parents or loved ones and make sure they are receiving adequate care and make sure the environment is good for their needs.

MOST adult care homes that I recommend and work with have PRIVATE ROOMS AND PRIVATE HALF BATHS in the rooms.

If you or anyone you know is interested in touring some great adult care homes in the Portland Metropolitan area, call me anytime 24/7 503-723-1444
Alliance 4 Seniors Inc. FREE PLACEMENT SERVICES and SENIOR ADVOCATE

I also work with Comfort Hospice and Palliative Care and we offer quality HOSPICE CARE SERVICES. We are locally owned and operated. Call me anytime 503-723-1444.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
+2 #35 Dig deepGuest 2014-02-23 15:18:50
I am a registered nurse, and own an AFH. I find that families are willing to put their loved ones in homes that are convenient for them, and not always for the care of the person involved. They often only look at what suits their lifestyle; and do not want to be put out by an extra five or ten minute drive out of their way. Once they drop them off they only come by when they have to; or see them on a holiday. Adult Foster Homes are not cheap to run, and the cost should be higher than assisted living because the 1:1 care provided (even if you need to share a bathroom). The risk of falls in an assisted living are much higher, and the cost contributed to heal the individual is expensive from an injury fall. A nurse can't see all their people in a day in an assisted living. The state of oregon is consistently changing the laws in AFC to increase standards which needs to happen. However, the state is not realistic on what it cost to provide care to our seniors. The foster home system does work if ran properly, and ran according to the guidelines of the state. I feel registered nurses play a big role in maintaining these standards, and can really help our physicians save time too for more acute needs. The knowledge that a RN brings to a setting is experience that can not be bought. Do your homework. Look at the homes last survey at the state level (everyone that is ran gets a report yearly if they are approved by the state). It they are not approved by the state please beware, they do not want accountability; just the money. America needs to do their homework, and realize the money is for their parents needs, and not their own (if you don't get an inheritence, but your mom or dad got the best care that is what is important). There are nursing homes that do not warehouse people either, but they are also under federal guidelines, not just state (so there is even more oversight in my opinion). I am American, and not Romanian (but I do have friends of that culture). I find them to be loving, and very intelligent individuals; but their culture is different than ours. Dig deeper than your own need, and page one on the internet. Ask questions, and advocate for your loved one. Chances are that if it does not feel right there is a problem with something, and don't walk away not feeling like you don't have the answer. If you go to buy a car you do the research, and it should not be any different than placing your loved one (except they are more than a piece of a metal, and have feelings and needs). Good luck.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
+1 #36 Immigrant RacismGuest 2014-08-05 15:09:01
To the various racist comments regarding Romanians:
Romanians work hard to get what they earned, same as any other person, it was not handed to them. I can only understand someone’s hatred of successful immigrants as jealousy of what you yourself have not been able to achieve. Romanians battle a litigious immigration system, learning a new language and adapting to a new culture, while you are born in a country with every opportunity available right at your footstep. Make something of it and stop blaming those that work harder than you for your shortcomings.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
0 #37 Confessions of a Nursing AssistantGuest 2014-08-05 15:41:10
I worked for 10 years as a nursing assistant in WA in AFHs, nursing homes, rehab, and hospitals. Not every adult family home is perfect. Cutting corners or malpractice is inevitable in any type of business, but overall the care I was able to provide in an AFH was miles above that of a nursing facility. In a nursing facility I was responsible for 14-16 patients, the majority were not ambulatory. If a patient could walk, but was wabbly, they would be transitioned to a wheelchair in order to prevent falls, because patients that could walk and fall were a liability. My day consisted of continual potty and feeding. Any social interaction usually transpired while I was changing a diaper. The 24/7 nurse who had upwards of 20 patients could alleviate the institutional feel of the place, since she was mired in constant paperwork and medication dispensing. Nighttime care is certainly present, whether you want it or not. During a 12hr night shift I was required to check a patients diaper every 2 hrs. Once thru the night I had to change their diaper (soiled or not since I would get fired if the same diaper was left on the patient through the whole night). If having a shared bathroom is degrading, imagine having a private bathroom and an aide that pulls down your underwear every two hours through the night, where’s the dignity and respect for that individual. The nursing home was a corporation whose sole goal is to make money. Patients and staff were just replaceable pieces of the machine. In contrast, an AFH has up to of 6 residents. Most residents would get up around the same time, some would choose to sleep in. Meals were in a dining room, not a cafeteria. Food was food, not defrosted patties and sauce. Family was welcome anytime, day or night. Contrary to a nursing home where being immobile is a benefit, we worked to maintain mobility. Whether thru walks around the yard, tossing the ball around, reading, peeling eggs, cleaning potatoes, we always found ways to engage the residents. They weren’t just animals to be taken care of, they’re people with skills, feelings and needs beyond just the physical. To the person that commented that AFHs leave their residents soiled for 12hr, being left soiled during the day or at night, will lead to bed sores in at most 3 days. Bed sores are immediately reported to the state and an investigation is conducted into why they happened. It’s not something that goes unnoticed, since visiting nurses would quickly spot such a deterioration as well and report it. Being left soiled is absolute neglect and maltreatment, and contrary to what you implied, not something that routinely happens. Residents choose when to go to bed, though most would start falling asleep on the couch by 7. In a nursing home, I promise they wouldn’t be out drinking and dancing into the wee hours of the morning…they’re old, old people go to bed early. An AFH is the closest to a normal living environment, with the same caregivers (not just whatever person is on the schedule that shift) and with people who are directly accountable for your loved ones. I also grew up in an Adult Family Home. I would hear bed alarms & call bells going off in the in the middle of the night and worry about how my parents could function the next day with such little sleep. It was awkward to explain to friends what all these old people were doing in my house, but it quickly just became something that was part of my family. Some people have a pool, we have old people always asking how school was, and ready to tell you about how things were back in their day. There were always interruptions during our family time, and at times I grew inpatient of having to always wait while my mom helped one of the residents. But I also learned respect for human life and compassion for those less fortunate. If I ever reached the point where I couldn’t care for m in my home, an AFH would be my only choice and I’m glad and thankful that it is available.
Quote | Report to administrator
 
 
Guest
0 #38 guestGuest 2014-12-08 15:35:49
I've worked in both AFHs and assisted living facilities. The quality of care can be better in private pay AFHs, it just it depends the individual owner. Don't be impressed by a beautiful home. I can't stress that enough. Look at the quality of the caregivers and what the workload is like. Does the owner have a separate bath aid come in to give showers? Also the turnover rate for employees is telling. You really have to go over often, and don't schedule visits on the same day or a week in advance. Some homes seem great, but can be very lax at times.
Quote | Report to administrator