eROI prepares for a leap

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Articles - June 2010
Thursday, May 27, 2010
0610_ATS05
CEO Ryan Buchanan led a $1.5 million effort to upgrade eROI’s online platform.
PHOTO COURTESY OF EROI

PORTLAND After distinguishing itself as one of Oregon’s fastest-growing private companies in 2007, the 46-employee Portland-based e-marketing firm eROI saw its growth slow through 2008 and 2009. But don’t blame the recession.

What actually happened was more carefully orchestrated, CEO Ryan Buchanan explains. Beginning in January of 2008, Buchanan assembled a team of nine employees to build an online communications platform for email campaigns that can be tracked through mobile marketing channels and social media.

eROI plans to launch the $1.5 million platform in late June. Not only will the platform enable eROI to control its own destiny rather than being chained to licensed software, it will also vastly expand the company’s offerings, Buchanan says. “We need to come out of the chute with a solid application to leapfrog our competition,” he says.

eROI’s creative and technical staffers will also need to oversee a massive migration of 500 clients from the current system to the new one.

Buchanan, a big fan of the Oregon “indie spirit” and the chairman of the Software Association of Oregon, has gotten this far without outside investors. But he says he may consider new financial backing to take eROI to the next level. “We’ll want to make sure we’re in a position of strength before we bring in a new investor,” he says.

BEN JACKLET

 

 

Comments   

 
Ryan B
0 #1 Ryan B 2010-06-03 21:19:27
Ben - we are very psyched about our launch later this month. Thanks again for telling the story of one of the many success stories in the Portland software community. thx.
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Donna Arriaga
0 #2 Sneak PeekDonna Arriaga 2010-06-04 12:42:33
I had an opportunity to take a sneak peek at eROI's new platform last month during their product review webinar, and one word keeps circulating through my mind -- Slick!

The user interface was clean, easy to use and very straight forward. (However, it did seem as though there were fewer options for people who want to bypass wysiwyg and delve straight into html editing.)

But the feature I found most exciting is the new platform's aim to integrate a social constituent management system into the mix -- aka the ability to collect, manage and track not just email metrics but also data/metrics from social media channels. This is certainly an exciting step in the right direction!
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